Call At: +919779121071   |       Email:adminanytimehelp@gmail.com
Question & Answers
Home > Q/A
1. Mathematics Homework Help Mathematics is an important part of our everyday life. We do calculations at every
Posted On: Nov. 11, 2017
Author: Shipra


1. Mathematics Homework Help Mathematics is an important part of our everyday life. We do calculations at every step and in every field, are It our daily routine or work or leisure activities. Mathematics is the science and study of quantity, structure, space, and change. Mathematicians seek out pattern, formulate new conjectures, and establish truth by rigorous deduction from appropriately chosen axioms and definitions. There is dispute over whether mathematical objects such as numbers and points exist naturally or are human creations. According to the renowned mathematician Benjamin Peirce, “mathematics is the science that draws necessary conclusions. “ Through the use of abstraction and logical reasoning, mathematics evolved from counting, calculation, measurement, and the systematic study of the shapes and motions of physical objects. Practical mathematics has been a human activity for as far back as written records go. Today, mathematics is used throughout the world as an essential tool in many fields, including natural science, engineering, medicine, and the social sciences. Applied mathematics, the branch of mathematics concerned with application of mathematical knowledge to other fields, inspires and makes use of new mathematical discoveries and sometimes leads to the development of entirely new disciplines Mathematics can, broadly speaking, be subdivided into the study of quantity, structure, space, and change (i.e. arithmetic, algebra, geometry, and analysis. Applied mathematics considers the use of abstract mathematical tools in solving concrete problems in the sciences, business, and other areas. Applied mathematics has significant overlap with the discipline of statistics, whose theory is formulated mathematically, especially with probability theory. Thus getting help in solving mathematical problems would be a great help to the student. 2. Physics Homework Help Physics is a natural science. Broadly speaking, it is the general analysis of nature, conducted in order to understand how the world and universe behave Physics is one of the oldest academic disciplines, perhaps the oldest through its inclusion of astronomy. Over the last two millennia, physics had been considered synonymous with philosophy, chemistry, and certain branches of mathematics and biology, but during the Scientific Revolution in the 16th century, it emerged to become a unique modern science in its own right. However, in some subject areas such as in mathematical physics and quantum chemistry, the boundaries of physics remain difficult to distinguish. Physics is both significant and influential, in part because advances in its understanding have often translated into new technologies, but also because new ideas in physics often resonate with the other sciences, mathematics and philosophy. For example, advances in the understanding of electromagnetism led directly to the development of new products which have dramatically transformed modern-day society (e.g., television, computers, and domestic appliances); advances in thermodynamics led to the development of motorized transport; and advances in mechanics inspired the development of calculus. Physics covers a wide range of phenomena, from the smallest sub-atomic particles, to the largest galaxies. Physics aims to describe the various phenomena that occur in nature in terms of simpler phenomena. Thus, physics aims to both connect the things we see around us to root causes, and then to try to connect these causes together in the hope of finding an ultimate reason for why nature is as it is. Understanding Physics has therefore become very important and its homework help is or prime importance to the students. 3. Chemistry Homework Help Chemistry is the science concerned with the composition, structure, and properties of matter, as well as the changes it undergoes during chemical reactions. It is a physical science for studies of various atoms, molecules, crystals and other aggregates of matter whether in isolation or combination, which incorporates the concepts of energy and entropy in relation to the spontaneity of chemical processes. Modern chemistry evolved out of alchemy following the chemical revolution Disciplines within chemistry are traditionally grouped by the type of matter being studied or the kind of study. These include inorganic chemistry, the study of inorganic matter; organic chemistry, the study of organic matter; biochemistry, the study of substances found in biological organisms; physical chemistry, the energy related studies of chemical systems at macro, molecular and sub molecular scales; analytical chemistry, the analysis of material samples to gain an understanding of their chemical composition and structure. Many more specialized disciplines have emerged in recent years, e.g. neurochemistry the chemical study of the nervous system. Chemistry is the scientific study of interaction of chemical substances that are constituted of atoms or the subatomic particles: protons, electrons and neutrons. Atoms combine to produce molecules or crystals. Chemistry is often called "the central science" because it connects the other natural sciences such as astronomy, physics, material science, biology, and geology. Chemistry is an integral part of the science curriculum both at the high school as well as the early college level. At these levels, it is often called "general chemistry" which is an introduction to a wide variety of fundamental concepts that enable the student to acquire tools and skills useful at the advanced levels, whereby chemistry is invariably studied in any of its various sub-disciplines. Scientists, engaged in chemical research are known as chemists. Most chemists specialize in one or more sub-disciplines. Hence it is good to study Chemistry and its practical implications / uses in various areas of our day to day life. 4. Biology Homework Help Biology is the science that studies living organisms. Prior to the nineteenth century, biology came under the general study of all natural objects called natural history. It is now a standard subject of instruction at schools and universities around the world, and over a million papers are published annually in a wide array of biology and medicine journals. Biology examines the structure, function, growth, origin, evolution, distribution and classification of all living things. Biology is the study of the many varieties of life. Traditionally, the specialized disciplines of biology are grouped by the type of organism being studied: botany, the study of plants; zoology, the study of animals; and microbiology, the study of microorganisms. These fields are further divided based on the scale at which organisms are studied and the methods used to study them: biochemistry examines the fundamental chemistry of life, molecular biology studies the complex interactions of systems of biological molecules, cellular biology examines the basic building block of all life, the cell; physiology examines the physical and chemical functions of the tissues and organ systems of an organism; and ecology examines how various organisms interrelate with their environment. There are five unifying principles of biology Cell theory. All living organisms are made of one or more cells, the basic living unit of function in organisms. All cells come from preexisting cells that multiply through cell division. Evolution. Through natural selection and genetic drift, a population's inherited traits change from generation to generation. Genes. A living organism's traits are encoded in DNA. Segments of DNA that, taken as a whole, specify a trait are known as genes. In addition, traits are passed on from one generation to the next by way of these genes. All information transfers from the genotype, the unobservable genetic traits, to the phenotype, the observable physical or biochemical characteristics of the organism. Although the phenotype expressed by the gene may adapt to the environment of the organism, that information is not transferred back to the genes. Only through the process of evolution do genes change in response to the environment. Homeostasis. The physiological processes that allow an organism to maintain its internal environment notwithstanding its external environment. Energy. The attribute of any living organism that is essential for its state. (E.g. required for metabolism) Thus, it is very important to study biology as it helps in understanding the life 5. Statistics Homework Help Statistics is a mathematical science pertaining to the collection, analysis, interpretation or explanation, and presentation of data. Statisticians improve the quality of data with the design of experiments and survey sampling. Statistics also provides tools for prediction and forecasting using data and statistical models. Statistics is applicable to a wide variety of academic disciplines, including natural and social sciences, government, and business. Statistical methods can be used to summarize or describe a collection of data; this is called descriptive statistics. This is useful in research, when communicating the results of experiments. Inference is a vital element of scientific advance, since it provides a prediction (based in data) for where a theory logically leads. There is also a discipline called mathematical statistics, which is concerned with the theoretical basis of the subject. The word statistics can either be singular or plural... In its singular form, statistics refers to the mathematical science discussed in this article. In its plural form, statistics is the plural of the word statistic, which refers to a quantity (such as a mean) calculated from a set of data. A common goal for a statistical research project is to investigate causality, and in particular to draw a conclusion on the effect of changes in the values of predictors or independent variables on dependent variables or response. There are two major types of causal statistical studies: experimental studies and observational studies. In both types of studies, the effect of differences of an independent variable (or variables) on the behavior of the dependent variable are observed. The difference between the two types lies in how the study is actually conducted. Each can be very effective. An experimental study involves taking measurements Statistics can be used as statistical tests and procedure. Some of them are:- Analysis of variance (ANOVA) Chi – square test Correlation Factor analysis Regression analysis Time series analysis etc. All these tests and procedure help in understanding and analyzing a mathematical problem. 6. Computer Science Homework Help Computer science (or computing science) is the study of the theoretical foundations of information and computation, and of practical techniques for their implementation and application in computer systems. It is frequently described as the systematic study of algorithmic processes that describe and transform information. Computer science has many sub-fields; such as computer graphics, emphasize the computation of specific results, while others, such as computational complexity theory, study the properties of computational problems. Still others focus on the challenges in implementing computations. For example, programming language theory studies approaches to describing computations, while computer programming applies specific programming languages to solve specific computational problems, and human-computer interaction focuses on the challenges in making computers and computations useful, usable, and universally accessible to people. The general public sometimes confuses computer science with vocational areas that deal with computers (such as information technology), or think that it relates to their own experience of computers, which typically involves activities such as gaming, web-browsing, and word-processing. However, the focus of computer science is more on understanding the properties of the programs used to implement software such as games and web-browsers, and using that understanding to create new programs or improve existing ones. As a discipline, computer science spans a range of topics from theoretical studies of algorithms and the limits of computation to the practical issues of implementing computing systems in hardware and software The use of computer science helps in a big the understanding of technical problems and arriving at a reasonably correct engineering solution. 7. English Homework Help English studies are an academic discipline that includes the study of literatures written in the English language, which includes English literature also from various English speaking countries around the world. English studies explores the production and analysis of texts produced in English (or in areas of the world in which English is a common mode of communication). Study of English language helps in improving communication with the other English speaking people all over the world. In most English-speaking countries, the literary and cultural dimensions of English studies are typically practiced in university departments of English, while the study of texts produced in non-English languages takes place in other departments, such as departments of foreign language or comparative literature. English linguistics is often studied in separate departments of linguistics. This disciplinary divide between a dominant linguistic or a literary orientation is one motivation for the division of the North American Modern Language Association (MLA) into two subgroups. At universities in non-English-speaking countries, the same department often covers all aspects of English studies including linguistics: this is reflected. As a broad program of study, the English Major provides students with an opportunity to analyze works of literature and film originally written in English. Such an analysis prompts students to exercise both critical thinking skills, in which they analyze and reflect upon a text such that they can later interpret it and find meaning, and to present the results of their analysis in clear, cogent writing. A degree in English offers college graduates career opportunities in a number of fields which include (but are not limited to) writing, editing, publishing, teaching and research, advertising, public relations, law, and finance. 8. Essay Writing An essay is usually a short piece of writing. It is often written from an author's personal point of view. Essays can be literary criticism, political manifestos, and learned arguments, observations of daily life, recollections, and reflections of the author. The definition of an essay is vague, overlapping with those of an article and a short story. Almost all modern essays are written in prose, but works in verse have been dubbed essays (e.g. Alexander Pope's An Essay on Criticism and An Essay on Man). While brevity usually defines an essay, voluminous works like John Locke's An Essay Concerning Human Understanding and Thomas Malthus's An Essay on the Principle of Population provide counterexamples. It is very difficult to define the genre into which essays fall. According to Aldous Huxley, leading essayists:- “Like the novel, the essay is a literary device for saying almost everything about almost anything, usually on a certain topic. By tradition, almost by definition, the essay is a short piece, and it is therefore impossible to give all things full play within the limits of a single essay. But a collection of essays can cover almost as much ground, and cover it almost as thoroughly, as can a long novel. Essays belong to a literary species whose extreme variability can be studied most effectively within a three-poled frame of reference. There is the pole of the personal and the autobiographical; there is the pole of the objective, the factual, and the concrete-particular; and there is the pole of the abstract-universal. Most essayists are at home and at their best in the neighborhood of only one of the essay's three poles, or at the most only in the neighborhood of two of them. There are the predominantly personal essayists, who write fragments of reflective autobiography and who look at the world through the keyhole of anecdote and description. There are the predominantly objective essayists who do not speak directly of themselves, but turn their attention outward to some literary or scientific or political theme. … And how splendid, how truly oracular are the utterances of the great generalizers! … The most richly satisfying essays are those which make the best not of one, not of two, but of all the three worlds in which it is possible for the essay to exist Essay writing home work throws a big challenge and can be really useful in several areas. 9. Engineering homework help Engineering is the science, discipline, art and profession of acquiring and applying technical, scientific and mathematical knowledge to design and implement materials, structures, machines, devices, systems, and processes that safely realize a desired objective or inventions. One who practices engineering is called an engineer, and those licensed to do so may have more formal designations such as Professional Engineer, Chartered Engineer, Incorporated Engineer, or European Engineer. The broad discipline of engineering encompasses a range of more specialized sub disciplines, each with a more specific emphasis on certain fields of application and particular areas of technology. With the rise of engineering as a profession in the eighteenth century, the term became more narrowly applied to fields in which mathematics and science were applied to these ends. Similarly, in addition to military and civil engineering the fields then known as the mechanic arts became incorporated into engineering. Engineering, much like science, is a broad discipline which is often broken down into several sub-disciplines. These disciplines concern themselves with differing areas of engineering work. Although initially an engineer will be trained in a specific discipline, throughout an engineer's career the engineer may become multi-disciplined, having worked in several of the outlined areas. Historically the main Branches of Engineering are categorized as follows:- • Aerospace Engineering - The design of aircraft, spacecraft and related topics. • Chemical Engineering - The exploitation of chemical principles in order to carry out large scale chemical processing, as well as designing new speciality materials and fuels. • Civil Engineering - The design and construction of public and private works, such as infrastructure (roads, railways, water supply and treatment etc.), bridges and buildings. • Electrical Engineering - The design of electrical systems, such as transformers, as well as electronic goods. • Mechanical Engineering - The design of physical or mechanical systems, such as engines, power trains, kinematic chains and vibration isolation equipment. Hence, engineering subjects require help in homework and the same can be provided by knowledgeable tutors 10. Matlab MATLAB is a numerical computing environment and fourth generation programming language. Developed by The Math Works, MATLAB allows matrix manipulation, plotting of functions and data, implementation of algorithms, creation of user interfaces, and interfacing with programs in other languages. Although it is numeric only, an optional toolbox uses the MuPAD symbolic engine, allowing access to computer algebra capabilities. An additional package, Simulink, adds graphical multi domain simulation and Model-Based Design for dynamic and embedded systems. In 2004, MathWorks claimed that MATLAB was used by more than one million people across industry and the academic world. MATLAB (meaning "matrix laboratory") was invented in the late 1970s by Cleve Moler, then chairman of the computer science department at the University of New Mexico. He designed it to give his student’s access to LINPACK and EISPACK without having to learn FORTRAN. It soon spread to other universities and found a strong audience within the applied mathematics community. Jack Little, an engineer, was exposed to it during a visit Moler made to Stanford University in 1983. Recognizing its commercial potential, he joined with Moler and Steve Bangert. They rewrote MATLAB in C and founded The Math Works in 1984 to continue its development. These rewritten libraries were known as JACKPAC... In 2000, MATLAB was rewritten to use a newer set of libraries for matrix manipulation, LAPACK MATLAB was first adopted by control design engineers, Little's specialty, but quickly spread to many other domains. It is now also used in education, in particular the teaching of linear algebra and numerical analysis, and is popular amongst scientists involved with image processing. As can be seen, MATLAB has now found many applications and it is useful to have tutors for the same. 11. I.T homework help Information technology (IT), as defined as the study, design, development, implementation, support or management of computer-based information systems, particularly software applications and computer hardware. IT deals with the use of electronic computers and computer software to convert, store, protect process, transmit, and securely retrieve information. Today, the term information technology has ballooned to encompass many aspects of computing and technology, and the term has become very recognizable. IT professionals perform a variety of duties that range from installing applications to designing complex computer networks and information databases. A few of the duties that IT professionals perform may include data management, networking, engineering computer hardware, database and software design, as well as the management and administration of entire systems. When computer and communications technologies are combined, the result is information technology, or "infotech". Information technology is a general term that describes any technology that helps to produce, manipulate, store, communicate, and/or disseminate information. Presumably, when speaking of Information Technology (IT) as a whole, it is noted that the use of computers and information are associated. IT has a vast application and is used in several areas of industry as well schools and colleges. In fact, in today’s world, we can not live without making use of information technology, one way or the other. It is used in doing our day to day task such as shopping, sending information, doing home work, the list is endless and the areas of application are growing day by day. IT homework goes a big way in providing assistance in this vast field of operation. 12. Psychology Homework Help Psychology is an academic and applied discipline involving the systematic, and often scientific, study of human/animal mental functions and behavior. Occasionally, in addition or opposition to employing the scientific method, it also relies on symbolic interpretation and critical analysis, although it often does so less prominently than other social sciences such as sociology. Psychologists study such phenomena as perception, cognition, attention, emotion, motivation, personality, behavior and interpersonal relationships. Some, especially depth psychologists, also study the unconscious mind. Psychological knowledge is applied to various spheres of human activity, including issues related to everyday life—such as family, education and employment—and to the treatment of mental health problems. Psychologists attempt to understand the role of mental functions in individual and social behavior, while also exploring the underlying physiological and neurological processes. Psychology includes many sub-fields of study and applications concerned with such areas as human development, sports, health, industry, media and law. Psychology incorporates research from the natural sciences, social sciences and humanities. A professional theorist or practitioner of psychology is called a psychologist. Psychology encompasses a vast domain, and includes many different approaches to the study of mental processes and behavior. Psychology tends to be eclectic, drawing on knowledge from other fields to help explain and understand psychological phenomena. Additionally, psychologists make extensive use of the three modes of inference that were identified by C. S. Peirce: Deduction, induction, and abduction (hypothesis generation). While often employing deductive-nomological reasoning, they also rely on inductive reasoning to generate explanations. For example, evolutionary psychologists propose explanations of human behavior in terms of such behaviors' advantages for hunter-gatherers. Academic psychologists may focus purely on research and psychological theory, aiming to further psychological understanding in a particular area, while other psychologists may work in applied psychology to deploy such knowledge for immediate and practical benefit. These approaches are not mutually exclusive, and many psychologists will be involved in both researching and applying psychology at some point during their career. Many clinical psychology programs aim to develop in practicing psychologists both knowledge of and experience with research and experimental methods, which they may interpret and employ as they treat individuals with psychological issues. Study of psychology is important not only to understand behavior but also to find out various ways of interpretation of the same. 13. Philosophy Homework Help Philosophy is the study of general and fundamental problems concerning matters such as existence, knowledge, truth, beauty, law, justice, validity, mind, and language. Philosophy is distinguished from other ways of addressing these questions (such as mysticism or mythology) by its critical, generally systematic approach and its reliance on reasoned argument. Philosophy comes from the Greek [philosophical), which literally translates to "love of wisdom. The following branches are the main areas of study: • Metaphysics investigates the nature of being and the world. Traditional branches are cosmology and ontology. • Epistemology is concerned with the nature and scope of knowledge, and whether knowledge is possible. Among its central concerns has been the challenge posed by skepticism and the relationships between truth, belief, and justification. • Ethics, or 'moral philosophy', is concerned with questions of how persons ought to act or if such questions are answerable. The main branches of ethics are meta-ethics, normative ethics, and applied ethics. Meta-ethics concerns the nature of ethical thought, comparison of various ethical systems, whether there are absolute ethical truths, and how such truths could be known. Ethics is also associated with the idea of morality. Plato's early dialogues include a search for definitions of virtue. • Political philosophy is the study of government and the relationship of individuals and communities to the state. It includes questions about justice, the good, law, property, and the rights and obligations of the citizen. • Aesthetics deals with beauty, art, enjoyment, sensory-emotional values, perception, and matters of taste and sentiment. • Logic deals with patterns of thinking that lead from true premises to true conclusions, originally developed in Ancient Greece. Beginning in the late 19th century, mathematicians such as Frege focused on a mathematical treatment of logic, and today the subject of logic has two broad divisions: mathematical logic (formal symbolic logic) and what is now called philosophical logic. • Philosophy of mind deals with the nature of the mind and its relationship to the body, and is typified by disputes between dualism and materialism. In recent years there have been increasing similarities, between this branch of philosophy and cognitive science. • Philosophy of language is the reasoned inquiry into the nature, origins, and usage of language. • Philosophy of religion is a branch of philosophy that asks questions about religion. Most academic subjects have a philosophy, for example the philosophy of science, the philosophy of mathematics, the philosophy of logic, the philosophy of law, and the philosophy of history. In addition, a range of academic subjects have emerged to deal with areas which would have historically been the subject of philosophy. These include psychology, anthropology and science. Hence we can say that study of philosophy makes sense in every filed of study and help is available for study of the same from knowledgeable tutors. 14. Humanities Homework Help The humanities are academic disciplines which study the human condition, using methods that are primarily analytic, critical, or speculative, as distinguished from the mainly empirical approaches of the natural and social sciences. Examples of the disciplines, related to humanities are ancient and modern languages, literature, history, philosophy, religion, visual and performing arts (including music). Additional subjects sometimes included in the humanities are technology, anthropology, area studies, communication studies and cultural studies, although these are often regarded as social sciences. Scholars working in the humanities are sometimes described as "humanists". However, that term also describes the philosophical position of humanism, which some "anti humanist" scholars in the humanities reject. The study of humanities can be conducted in several fields such as Classics, history, languages, law, literature, performing arts, (which includes, music, theatre and dance), philosophy, religion, visual arts (including history of visual arts, media types, painting), The classics were formerly considered one of the cornerstones of the humanities, but the classics declined in importance during the 20th century. Nevertheless, the influence of classical ideas in humanities such as philosophy and literature remains strong. History is systematically collected information about the past. When used as the name of a field of study, history refers to the study and interpretation of the record of humans, families, and societies. Knowledge of history is often said to encompass both knowledge of past events and historical thinking skills. All these fields are interesting studies and homework provides assistance to students in various areas of humanities 15. History Homework Help History is the study of the past, with special attention to the written record of the activities of human beings over time. Scholars who write about history are called historians. It is a field of research which uses a narrative to examine and analyse the sequence of events, and it often attempts to investigate objectively the patterns of cause and effect that determine events Historians debate the nature of history and the lessons history teaches. A famous quote by George Santayana has it that "Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it." The stories common to a particular culture, but not supported by external sources (such as the legends surrounding King Arthur) are usually classified as cultural heritage rather than the "disinterested investigation" needed by the discipline of history Since historians are observers and participants, the works they produce are written from the perspective of their own time and sometimes with due concern for possible lessons for their own future. All events that are remembered and preserved in some authentic form constitute the historical record. The task of historical discourse is to identify the sources which can most usefully contribute to the production of accurate accounts of past. It is extremely important for us to study history as this gives us an insight as to how the situations and events were dealt with in the past. It also helps us in understanding as to why they were treated in a particular fashion. Lastly it helps is in understanding the current situations and problems and gives us knowledge and power to deal with the current problems



VIEW FILE
The following information is from the Word document that I am supposed to put my
Posted On: Nov. 3, 2017
Author: Shipra


The following information is from the Word document that I am supposed to put my answers on. The attachment file is an excel spreadsheet with the necessary information to do the lab assignment. Math 221 **** Example Format **** Week 6 Lab Submitted by: (Insert Name Here **REMOVE THIS NOTE PRIOR TO SUBMITTING**) (Note: Your labs should be well organized, with results clearly identified and in the proper order. When answering questions, be sure to use complete sentences and proper grammar. It is also important for you to fully explain your answers! Please do not answer “yes” (or “no”); you should explain why the answer is “yes”. **REMOVE THIS NOTE PRIOR TO SUBMITTING**) Part 1. Normal Distributions and Birth Weights in America (Insert your answers to the 5 questions on Birth Weights here. Be sure to carefully follow the examples worked in the Normal Ex worksheet from the Week6Lab.xls file. Copy-and-paste the Excel commands and/or Normal Probability Distributions you use to answer Questions 2a, 3a and 4a. You do not need to copy-and-paste anything for the other questions; you must provide your answers, however. **REMOVE THIS NOTE PRIOR TO SUBMITTING**) Part 2. Age Distribution in the United States (Insert your answers to the 6 questions on Age Distribution here. See the Age Dist worksheet from the Week6Lab.xls file. That worksheet has the data entered for you, as well as some of the required work. **REMOVE THIS NOTE PRIOR TO SUBMITTING**) Part 3. Finding z- and t-scores for Confidence Intervals 1. Using Excel, find the z-score that corresponds to the following Confidence Levels: a. 80% b. 85% c. 92% d. 97% 2. Using Excel, find the t-score that corresponds to the following Confidence Levels and Sample Sizes: a. 95% with n = 25 b. 96% with n = 15 c. 97% with n = 21 d. 91% with n = 10 3. Suppose we wish to estimate the population mean using a confidence interval. When is it appropriate to use a z-score? When is it appropriate to use a t-score? (Answer the above questions. Format your answers so that they are clearly shown. See the worksheet Conf Intervals from the Week6Lab.xls file for examples on finding z- and t-scores. You will find the above questions also posted inside that worksheet. You do not need to copy-and-paste anything from Excel here. **REMOVE THIS NOTE PRIOR TO SUBMITTING**) Part 4. Bob’s Candies 1. Find the sample mean and sample standard deviation of the amount citizens spend per year. 2. When finding a confidence interval for the true mean spent of ALL citizens, should we use a z-score or a t-score? Why? 3. Find the z/t-values (as appropriate) for a 95% confidence interval and a 92% confidence interval. 4. Find a 95% and a 92% confidence interval for the true mean amount that citizens spend per year. 5. What do you think the lowest possible mean amount spent per year is? Why? 6. Do you think Bob has a good customer base for his new business? Explain. (Answer the above questions. Format your answers so that they are clearly shown. See the worksheet Candy Business from the Week6Lab.xls file for a complete description of Bob’s situation. Then, use your knowledge of Excel and Confidence Intervals to answer the above questions. You will find the above questions also posted inside the worksheet. You do not need to copy-and-paste anything from Excel here. **REMOVE THIS NOTE PRIOR TO SUBMITTING**)



VIEW FILE
Probability Probability is the branch of mathematics that deals with the quantitative likelihood
Posted On: Nov. 3, 2017
Author: Shipra


Math Probability Probability is the branch of mathematics that deals with the quantitative likelihood of occurrence of an event or outcome. The probability of an outcome can have any value from 0 to 1, where a probability of 0 means the outcome will never happen and probability of 1 means the outcome will certainly happen (Singer). 1 Binomial Distribution Before delving into the details of binomial distribution, let us first try to understand the binomial experiment and binomial probability. If x denotes the number of successes from n repeated trials of the binomial experiment and p denotes the probability of success of each trial, then the binomial probability is given by: Where q = 1 – p is the probability of failure. The probability of exactly x successes in n repeated Bernoulli trials is given by: Now coming to the binomial distribution, the number of x successes in n repeated trials of a binomial experiment is called a binomial random variable. The probability distribution of this random variable is called a binomial distribution. P(x successes in n trials) = p(x) = The properties of the binomial distribution are: Mean, Variance, Standard deviation, To summarize, Binomial distribution is a probability distribution that gives us the probabilities of x number of success in n repeated trials in a binomial experiment. It is applied to mutually exclusive outcomes of a trial and gives the full range of possible values that a random variable can take. As shown in figure 2, in binomial distribution the probability of occurrence is plotted as a function of the number of observations. Figure 2: Binomial Distribution of outcomes from an experiment The histogram gives the shape of the distribution at a glance. The range of values is broken into intervals of equal lengths. The number of observations associated with each interval is counted and plotted on x-axis and corresponding frequencies are plotted on y-axis. The height of the bar represents the number of observations. (Stattucino) 2 Applications Probability is extensively used in Mathematics, finance, statistics, gambling and science to estimate the potential occurrence of an event or outcome. Probability plays extremely role in assessing the involved risks with launching new commodity products. The stochastic models take into considerations several prevailing and foreseeable factors in determining the probability of success. (Wikipedia) Reliability of products and parts is also based on the theory of probability. Reliability theory focuses on minimizing the probability of failure, and also influences the vendor’s policies on after sale services and warranties (Lehoczky, 2006). Binomial experiments find their applications in a wide variety of practical fields. Probability is very common in medical research for drug sampling and pharmaceutical products. It is used in genetic engineering for analyzing the probability of occurrence of parental diseases and life expectancies in particular groups and areas etc. Binomial statistics are also applied to the studies of likelihood of epidemics, demographic patterns, opinion pooling regarding politicians, companies and products and so on (Tuckwell, 1988). Industrial Applications include quality control where a number of parts are selected randomly for inspection and detailed testing out of a batch. This data forms the basis for statistical analysis of defective parts out of a fixed number of manufactured parts. Such studies prove helpful in improving overall quality assurance processes (Tuckwell, 1988). For companies, statistical data is of extreme importance for marketing new products. Such data is based on opinion polling on public acceptance for certain products, public demand for new characteristics and potential contenders in the market (Wadsworth, 1974). Binomial theorem can be used to factorize sums which help in programming as it makes it easier to load an algebraic program as well as simplify sums to aid in debugging and clarity of compositions. Binomial theorem is also applied in situations involving distribution of a net charge over a large region, like you want to distribute anything which is finite than in that cases you may use binomial theorem. In the internet you may use this method in internet protocol (ip) distribution conditions like you have been given ip address that are of fixed host and number of host are more than total round off than you may use this theorem to distribute bits so that all host may be covered in ip addressing this method is known as variable sub netting. Binomial theorem is also used in architecture to give shapes and determine the areas of infrastructure to find out about the amount of materials needed to be use in those particular areas. It also helps in the estimation and calculations of the total expenditure to build the buildings, so all the financial cost depends indirectly on binomial theorem. 2.1 Applications in Finance Statisticians and business professionals use various probability tools for analyzing various markets and the financial risks involved. The applications of the probability can be seen in expected returns in addition to the market financial analysis (Lehoczky, 2006). In financial sense, the probability is considered as the vague possibility of some certain expected event to happen. In more lose sense; probability can also be used as a synonym of chance. The experiment in case of probability for financial analysis is said to be deterministic if the outcome is certain and conversely, if the outcome is not unique and it can be from several possibilities, it is called a random or probabilistic phenomenon. For example in case of a dice, there can be nay outcome from 1 to 6 and therefore it is an example of random experiment. 3.2 Biased and Unbiased Experiments When a dice is thrown and there are chances to believe and its is expected that a certain number will turn up more often as compared to the rest of the integers, we call it a biased experiment in which the outcomes are already expected. In a similar way, we can toss a coin as a biased or unbiased experiment on the basis of the historical data regarding the occurrences of tail or head (Rudas, 2008). The outcomes in any experiment are called the occurrences e.g. a coin has two occurrences whereas a dice has 6 occurrences (Rudas, 2008). To understand and learn probability and binomial, in fact statistics in short, it is very important to understand the problems that can be faced and resolved by suing statistical tools. Let us take review of these problems first (Pfenning, 1998): Suppose, you are a doctor and you are interested in developing some sort of cancer cure. You have to work on various existing medicines and assume you are working on a medicine labeled CCC. The data from the patients who used this medicine is available and you want to analyze the data about the efficiency of this medicine in cancer treatment. In this situation definitely, you will use various statistical methods to analyze the data (Pfenning, 1998). In another situation, if you are a politician and a candidate for presidential elections for United States, you have the details and polls data about the New Hampshire and you want to know about the chances of success of your candidate if there is some election on the basis of currant data (Pfenning, 1998). You are managing a small company that is involved in construction activities. There are almost 20 trucks used for transportation and there are chances that some of these trucks might breakdown on a certain day. If there is probability that one out of ten trucks can face technical problems, you might be interested to calculate the total cost of the maintenance for the whole month to manage your managerial activities and estimating the budget (Lehoczky, 2006). Lastly, suppose there is a machine that is used to produce screws of almost 1 inch. However, on Wednesday a batch of screws was produced that was averaged about 1.01 inches. This record is persistent and sometimes that machine produces size variable screw badges. Being a manager, you will be interested to find out the reason for this error. This can be a mechanical or human issue but you need to investigate the issue by using the available record (Lavine, 1993). The core of above mentioned problems lies in the probability or chance. It means some events can happen or not and our purpose is to find the chance of the specific event to happen or how frequently, a certain event can happen? In simple words, we are interested to know the probability (Kendall, 1988). 3.3 Probabilities and Decisions There are two main distinctions between the ultimate decision and probability related questions (Kaplan, 2006): 1. In the decision related problems, there is always involved some sort of evaluation or analysis of the results. On the other hand, the simple questions about probability can be analyzed without any evaluation of the data or consequences (Kaplan, 2006). 2. Usually, there is a complex combination of consequences and sets of probabilities are involved in questions regarding decisions along with the evaluations. Let us take the example of a constructor that is required by the client to send at least 17 trucks to the job for transportation and there might be some loss if the contractor agrees to provide that many numbers of trucks even if he can not meet the requirement. Moreover, the contractor can also face problems in terms of good will and honesty in business and may loss the trust of the client after failing to provide trucks as required. The decision problem here does not only involve the monetary loss but the good will losses and other future consequences can be enough to destroy the business. Here the real decision complexity can be seen in the diagram below known as the decision tree (Kaplan, 2006). Fig: 7 Tree Diagram showing decision complexities References 1. Singer, James. “Probability.” Microsoft Encarta Premium. 2006. CD. 2. Raymond A. Barnett and Michael R. Ziegler. Applied Mathematics for Business, Economics, Life Sciences, and Social Sciences. 5th ed. NY: Dellen, 1994. Print. 3. “Conditional Probability.” Wolfram MathWorld. n.d. Web. 20 Apr. 2011. <http://mathworld.wolfram.com/ConditionalProbability.html> 4. “Conditional Probability.” Wikipedia. 7 May 2011. Web. 20 Apr. 2011. 5. “Joint Probability.” Investopedia. n.d. Web. 20 Apr. 2011. 6. “Independent Events.” Math Goodies. 5 May 2011. Web. 21 Apr. 2011. 7. “Sample Space.” Mathzone. n.d. Web. 21 Apr. 2011. 8. “Binomial Distribution.” Stattcino. n.d. Web. 26 Apr. 2011. <http://www.stattucino.com/berrie/graphs.html> 9. Abakuks, A. (1988). Applications of probability. Milton Keynes: Open University Press. 10. Asmann, E. N. (1988). Applications of the binomial and related probability distribution. Lake Forest, Ill.: Lake Forest College. 11. Bluman, A. G. (2005). Probability demystified. New York: McGraw-Hill. 12. Bluman, A. G. (2006). Elementary statistics: a brief version (3rd ed.). Boston: McGraw-Hill Higher Education. 13. Cushman, J., & Weston, M. (1991). Do you wanna bet?: your chance to find out about probability. New York: Clarion Books. 14. Deemer, R. L., Kruse, W. K., & Kaplan, A. J. (1974). Application of negative binomial probability to inventory control. Philadelphia: AMC Inventory Research Office. 15. Griffiths, D. (2008). Head first statistics. Farnham: O'Reilly. 16. Kaplan, M., & Kaplan, E. (2006). Chances are--: adventures in probability. New York: Viking. 17. Kendall, W. (1988). Applications of probability. Milton Keynes: Open University Press.. 18. Kerns, D. A. (2007). Automatic Target Recognition User Interface Tool . Ft. Belvoir: Defense Technical Information Center. 19. Landriault, D. (2006). Generalizations of the compound binomial model and their applications. Ottawa: Library and Archives Canada = BibliotheÌ€que et Archives Canada. 20. Lavine, M., & Parmigiani, M. (1993). Using probability to learn from data . Durham, N.C.: Institute of Statistics and Decision Sciences, Duke University. 21. Lehoczky, S., & Rusczyk, R. (2006). The art of problem solving (7th ed.). Alpine, CA: AoPS. 22. Lindley, D. V. (2006). Understanding uncertainty. Hoboken, N.J.: Wiley-Interscience. 23. Lipschutz, S., & Lipson, M. (2000). Schaum's outline of theory and problems of probability (2nd ed.). New York: McGraw-Hill. 24. LovaÌosz, L., PelikaÌon, J., & Vsztergombi, K. (2003). Discrete mathematics elementary and beyond. New York: Springer. 25. Moran, P. A. (1974). How to find out in statistical and probability theory . Edinburgh: Longman. 26. Movellan, J. R., & McClelland, J. L. (91991). Learn Probability Distributions with The Contrastive Hebbian Algorithm. The Artificial Intelligence and Psychology Project. Ft. Belvoir: Defense Technical Information Center. 27. Newman, J. R. (1960). The World of mathematics: a small library of the literature of mathematics from A'h-mosé the scribe to Albert Einstein : presented with commentaries and notes. London: Allen & Unwin. 28. Pfenning, N. (1998). Chances are--: making probability and statistics fun to learn and easy to teach. Waco, TX: Prufrock Press. 29. Rose, R. M., Beach, L. R., & Peterson, C. R. (311971). Failures to Find Probability Matching,. Ft. Belvoir: Defense Technical Information Center. 30. Rosen, K. H. (1993). Elementary number theory and its applications (3rd ed.). Reading, Mass.: Addison-Wesley Pub. Co.. 31. Rubinstein, M. (1993). Binomial option pricing with applications to exotic options. Sydney: University of New South Wales]. 32. Rudas, T. (2008). Handbook of probability: theory and applications. Los Angeles: Sage Publications. 33. Rumsey, D. J. (2006). Probability for dummies. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley Pub. 34. Seydel, R. (2009). Tools for computational finance (4th ed.). Berlin: Springer. 35. Skorokhod, A. V., & Prokhorov, I. V. (2004). Basic principles and applications of probability theory. Berlin: Springer. 36. Sleeper, A. D. (2007). Six sigma distribution modeling. New York: McGraw-Hill. 37. Spiegel, M. R., Hademenos, G. J., & Moyer, R. E. (2000). College algebra. New York: McGraw-Hill. 38. Tuckwell, H. C. (1988). Elementary applications of probability theory. London: Chapman and Hall. 39. Wadsworth, G. P., & Bryan, J. G. (1974). Applications of probability and random variables (2d ed.). New York: McGraw-Hill. 40. Wasserman, L. A. (2003). All of statistics: a concise course in statistical inference. New York: Springer. 41. Williamson, E., & Bretherton, M. H. (1963). Tables of the negative binomial probability distribution. London: Wiley. 42. “Real life Applications”, Binomial Expansion http://binomialexpansion.blogspot.com/ 43. “Application of Binomial Theorem”, Binomial Theorem http://entrance-exam.net/forum/general-discussion/what-applications-binomial-theorem-56079.html 44. “Web based binomial calculator”, Binomial distribution http://www.adsciengineering.com/bpdcalc/index.php



VIEW FILE
Syllabus for Precalculus Spring Semester 2015 MATH 1113-030, CRN 32464
Posted On: Nov. 1, 2017
Author: Shipra


Syllabus for Precalculus Spring Semester 2015 MATH 1113-030, CRN 32464 Department of Mathematics & Computer Science, GPC Online You must complete the No Show Agreement by January 18th or you will be reported as a No Show and denied access to this course. NO SHOW POLICY: Each semester faculty must report those students who are on the class roll but have NEVER attended an on-campus class or logged in to an online class during the No Show period. This procedure is very important in order to keep the college in compliance with the laws regarding federal financial aid. More information on the No Show Policy and the dates for the No Show period can be found online at http://www.gpc.edu/~gpcem/registrar/no_show.html. INSTRUCTOR INFORMATION Andy Imm, Instructor of Mathematics Email: Please use iCollege email. I will respond to your iCollege emails within 24 hours, excluding the weekends. If you are unable to access iCollege, you may email me at Andrew.Imm@gpc.edu. Department Website: http://www.gpc.edu/~olmathcs Phone: 404-965-6423 Please leave a voicemail message. I will return your call within 24 hours. Tutoring and Advising Hours: Mondays 4-8pm. GENERAL COURSE INFORMATION Credit hours:3 credit hours Prerequisite: Placement into college-level mathematics Purpose: This course provides a foundation in the study of trigonometry, including circular functions, triangle trigonometry, trigonometric equations and vectors. Selected topics from algebra are reviewed and extended. This course is designed to prepare students for calculus, algebra-based physics and related technical subjects. Read additional information about MATH 1113 in the Common Course Outline at http://depts.gpc.edu/~mcse/CourseDocs/math1113/Math_1113_CCO_Spr2014.pdf REQUIRED MATERIALS iCollege Access: Go to http://www.gpc.edu/icollege to get your iCollege username and password. WebAssign Access Code: You must purchase a WebAssign access code for this course. The ISBN for the access code which contains the electronic textbook is 978128585333. The ISBN for the access code along with a hardcopy of the textbook is 9781133909149. Because an electronic version of the textbook is available in WebAssign, you do NOT have to purchase a textbook unless you choose to do so. The textbook is Algebra & Trigonometry (3th edition) by Stewart, Redline and Wats (2011). The WebAssign Access Code will come bundled free with the purchase of a new textbook from GPC. The correct access code will NOT be included if you purchase a used textbook and may not be included if you purchase a book from an outside vendor such as Amazon.com. If you are unable to purchase your WebAssign code immediately, you can access WebAssign using a grace period for 14 days from the beginning of the semester. After this point, you must have a code to access WebAssign. Our class key for WebAssign is: gpc 8853 8366. YOU MUST USE YOUR SCHOOL EMAIL ADDRESS WHEN CREATING YOUR WEBASSIGN ACCOUNT. YOU WILL NOT RECEIVE CREDIT FOR WORK COMPLETED IF YOU DO NOT USE YOUR SCHOOL EMAIL ADDRESS. TI-84 graphing calculator: You are required to have access to a TI-84 calculator. A TI-89 or TI-92 calculator is not permitted for this course. For more information such as how to order your textbook or ISBN information, please visit http://www.gpc.edu/~olmathcs and select the Textbook Information link on the left side of the page. If you have an issue with your access code, please contact me ASAP. ATTENDANCE AND PARTICIPATION POLICY Students’ academic success is the major priority of the College. Because regular participation enhances the learning process, students are expected to adhere to the attendance policy set forth by the College and individual faculty members. Differences in content and teaching styles exist among courses, which can impact students’ learning. Therefore, students are strongly encouraged to attend all classes as defined below and prepare themselves thoroughly in advance for assignments, tests, and other course-related activities. Students are accountable for assignments and material covered during an absence. Attendance in this class will be determined through the use of WebAssign, Discussion boards, and iCollege tracking. You are expected to log into this class a minimum of 2 days per week. All course information and updates will be given through iCollege, so it is important that you log in regularly. iCOLLEGE COURSE CALENDAR Click the Calendar widget on the homepage to access the course calendar. It contains a suggested study schedule as well as the availability and due dates for tests, quizzes, and homework. I have provided a suggested study schedule on the calendar, but the important thing to keep in mind is that you complete the sections in a timely manner so that you are prepared to complete your quizzes, tests, and homework by the specified due dates. Pace yourself so that you are not overwhelmed and do not fall behind. There are hard deadlines and soft deadlines in this course. The soft deadlines in the course calendar are the days in which I suggest that you complete each assignments so that you do not fall behind in the course. Hard deadlines are the absolute last day that an assignment or quiz will be accepted. MAKEUP WORK Makeup work is neither given nor accepted. If you submit an assignment after it is due, you will be given a grade of “0” for the assignment. The availability of the assignments and their due dates are listed in the iCollege course calendar. It is your responsibility to check the calendar and to turn in your work on time. Due dates will NOT be extended because of technical difficulties. Do not wait until the last hour to complete an assignment in case a technical problem should arise! If your home computer is inoperable, you should utilize a GPC computer lab or a computer in a public library. If iCollege is unavailable for an extended period of time, email me using my GPC email address for further instruction. MIDPOINT The midpoint of the semester is Thursday, February 5th. This is the last day that you can withdraw from this course with a W. Your instructor will not withdraw your from this course. You must withdraw yourself if you find this is the best course of action for you. Go to the following website for instructions on how to withdraw online (you do NOT have to go on campus to withdraw): http://www.gpc.edu/~gpcem/registrar/howtowithdraw.html Several things to remember: • Although a W does not affect your GPC grade point average, a W does negatively impact your HOPE grade point average. For additional information on this, consult a GPC Student Accounts office: http://www.gpc.edu/~gpcsfs/student_accounts/ • If you withdraw after the midpoint, you will receive a WF that is averaged as an F in your GPA. ASSESSMENTS Homework (10%) There are 25 homework assignments to be completed in WebAssign. If you make an attempt to complete all assignments in a timely fashion, your lowest three homework grades will be dropped. You will be given five attempts per answer in WebAssign. Soft Deadlines vs. Hard Deadlines (SEE BELOW): The course calendar contains the suggested pacing for the homework and quizzes as well as the ultimate due date for these items. I STRONGLY suggest that you adhere to the suggested pacing in the calendar as students who do so tend to earn higher grades. Quizzes (15%) You will take six quizzes in WebAssign. You will have 75 minutes to complete each quiz. You will be given three attempts per quiz in WebAssign. Discussions/Projects (5%) Your participation in the course will be assessed by your participation in seven weekly discussions. In general, discussion posts are due by the end of every Tuesday starting on the second week of the semester. You may access Discussion topics via the iCollege Discussions link on the toolbar or via links contained inside the content modules. Tests (20%) There are two tests which will be taken in WebAssign at home from your computer during the semester. Test 1 covers the content in Unit 1. Test 2 covers the content in Unit 3. You will be given two attempts per test in WebAssign. Midterm Exam (20%) The midterm exam must be taken on one of the following dates: Monday February 2, Tuesday February 3, or Wednesday February 4. The midterm exam in the iCollege "ASSESSMENT" link will cover the content from Units 0, 1, and 2. Final Exam (30%) The final exam will be a proctored cumulative exam which will be taken without the help of notes or others. You must take the final exam on Monday, March 2nd or Tuesday, March 3rd on a GPC campus at one of the designated Online Mathematics final exam times. These times will be published soon after the semester starts. A formula sheet will be provided at the exam. The final exam in the iCollege "ASSESSMENT" link may NOT be taken outside of the final exam period, so please do not ask. If you do not live in the Atlanta area, contact me within the first week of class to make alternative testing arrangements. If you do not inform me of this need during the first week of classes, then you may not receive permission to test at an alternate site. GRADING SCALE A = 90-100% B = 80-89% C = 70-79% D = 60-69% F = 0-59% W = Withdrawal by midpoint WF = Student-initiated withdrawal after midpoint (PLEASE KEEP YOUR GRADES UP TO DATE. RECORDS OF ALL ASSESSMENTS AND AVERAGES SHOULD BE CHECKED MANUALLY.) FREE TUTORING - GPC LEARNING AND TUTORING CENTERS If you need in-person assistance with the material, try a GPC Math Lab! There are tutors available to help you for free! Alpharetta Center: http://www.gpc.edu/~duniss/alpharetta.htm Clarkston Campus: http://www.gpc.edu/~claiss Decatur Campus:http://www.gpc.edu/~deciss Dunwoody Campus:http://www.gpc.edu/~duniss Newton Campus: http://www.gpc.edu/newton-ltc There is also 5 hours of free online tutoring available through Smarthinking. (See the link on your course homepage.) OTHER COLLEGE POLICIES: INCLEMENT WEATHER POLICY In the event that inclement weather causes the college to be closed, online classes will continue. Please continue to work on your assignments. Log into iCollege for further instructions from your instructor. NO SHOW POLICY Each semester faculty must report those students who are on the class roll but have NEVER attended an on-campus class or logged in to an online class during the No Show period. This procedure is very important in order to keep the college in compliance with the laws regarding federal financial aid. More information on the No Show Policy and the dates for the No Show period can be found online at http://www.gpc.edu/~gpcem/registrar/no_show.html. EQUAL OPPORTUNITY STATEMENT Georgia Perimeter College supports the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Executive Order #11246, Title IX of the Educational Amendments of 1972, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act. No person shall, on the basis of age, race, religion, color, gender, sexual orientation, national origin, disability or veteran status, be excluded from participation in or be denied the benefits of or be subjected to discrimination under any program or activity of Georgia Perimeter College. Any individual with a grievance related to the enforcement of any of the above provisions should contact the Office of Human Resources. PRIVACY STATEMENT The college complies with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, which guarantees any student the right to inspect and review his or her educational records, to challenge the content of the records and to control disclosures from the education records with certain exceptions.” AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES STATEMENT If you are a student who is disabled as defined under the Americans with Disabilities Act and requires assistance or support services, please seek assistance through the Center for Disability Services. A CDS Counselor will coordinate those services. You must be registered with GPC's Center for Disability Services and email your instructor a copy of your accommodations letter within the first week of classes to be given specified accommodations on all of your assignments. (Accommodations will NOT be made for assignments that were taken before your accommodations letter was presented.) You can find the contact information for the CDS staff on this website: http://www.gpc.edu/~cds/. ACADEMIC HONESTY STATEMENT (MCSE Division) As a community committed to learning, Georgia Perimeter College recognizes and specifies that students, whether working as individuals or in a group, shall always present to the instructor their own work for an honest grade assessment. Academic Honesty Procedures have been established by Georgia Perimeter College to insure due process in cases of cheating. A copy of procedures is in the Student Handbook. Cheating of any kind may result in a penalty ranging from a grade of zero for the work in question to a grade of "F" in the course AND will be referred to the College Court for assignment of penalty that may include suspension from the College. Referral to the College Court is required whether the student admits or denies the violation. A full statement of the Academic Honesty Policy can be found online at http://depts.gpc.edu/governance/policies/New100/101.pdf. AFFIRMATIVE ACTION STATEMENT Georgia Perimeter College adheres to affirmative action policies designed to promote diversity and equal opportunity for all faculty and students. MILITARY OUTREACH CENTER (MOC) Georgia Perimeter College provides resources and support services for military, active duty, National Guard or Reserve, and veteran students, including spouses and dependents. The MOC actively maintains information regarding campus resources, communications, and contact with military and veteran students, as well as local VA support services. Georgia Perimeter College honors its military and veteran men and women returning to pursue their educational goals at GPC. Our goal is to assist each student with a comfortable transition to achieve academic success. More information can be found at http://depts.gpc.edu/militaryoutreach/. The Military Outreach Center is located on Clarkston Campus, Building CH, Suite 1300, and the phone number is 678-891-3025. GPC TOBACCO AND SMOKE-FREE CAMPUS POLICY Effective October 1, 2014, Georgia Perimeter prohibits the use of tobacco products on any property owned, leased, or controlled by GPC. All faculty, staff, students, visitors, vendors, contractors, and all others are prohibited from using any tobacco products while on GPC property. “Tobacco Products” is defined as cigarettes, pipes, cigars, all forms of smokeless tobacco, clove cigarettes and other smoking devices that use tobacco such as hookahs or simulate the use of tobacco such as electronic cigarettes. Violations of the smoking policy will be handled under the GPC Student Code of Conduct. PERFORMANCE ALERT FOR STUDENT SUCCESS (PASS) Academic success is a top priority at GPC. Activities have been designed to alert both instructor and student in a timely manner if sufficient progress on certain core concepts is not being made. A performance alert for student success (PASS) will be sent to academically struggling students throughout the semester to inform students of their status in the course and to provide additional resources for assistance. The notification enables students to address any academic weakness that could affect their successful completion of the course. If a student receives a PASS, the student should meet with the instructor to discuss their performance in the course and to design an improvement plan. PASS messages will be sent via email and by SMS text messaging. DUE DATES: Day Suggested Due Date Official Due Date Sections Covered (WebAssign Units 0 - 4) 1 Jan. 13 Jan. 20 Unit 0: College Algebra Review 2 Jan. 13 Jan. 20 Unit 1: 6.1 Angle Measure 3 Jan. 15 Jan. 20 Unit 1: 6.2 Trigonometry of Right Triangles 4 Jan. 20 Jan. 20 Discussion 1 (iCollege) 5 Jan. 20 Jan. 20 Quiz 1 (WebAssign) 6 Jan. 20 Jan. 27 Unit 1: 6.3 Trigonometric Functions of Angles 7 Jan 21 Jan. 27 Unit 1: 6.4 Inverse Trigonometric Functions and Right Triangles 8 Jan. 23 Jan. 27 Unit 1: 6.5 The Law of Sines 9 Jan. 26 Jan. 27 Unit 1: 6.6 The Law of Cosines 10 Jan. 26 Jan. 27 Discussion 2 (iCollege) 11 Jan. 26 Jan. 27 Quiz 2 (WebAssign) 12 Jan. 27 Jan. 27 Test 1 (WebAssign) 13 Jan. 28 Feb. 3 Unit 2: 7.1 The Unit Circle 14 Jan. 28 Feb. 3 Unit 2: 7.2 Trigonometric Functions of Real Numbers 15 Jan. 29 Feb. 3 Unit 2: 7.3 Trigonometric Graphs 15 Jan. 29 Feb. 3 Unit 2: 7.4 More Trigonometric Graphs 16 Jan. 30 Feb. 3 Unit 2: 7.5 Inverse Trigonometric Functions and Their Graphs 17 Feb. 2 Review for Midterm 18 Feb. 2 Feb. 4 Discussion 3 (iCollege) 19 Feb. 2 Feb. 4 Quiz 3 (WebAssign) 20 Feb. 2 – 4 Feb. 4 Midterm (iCollege) 21 Feb. 5 Feb. 10 Unit 3: 8.1 Trigonometric Identities 22 Feb. 6 Feb. 10 Unit 3: 8.2 Addition and Subtraction Formulas 23 Feb. 6 Feb. 10 Unit 3: 8.3 Double-Angle, Half-Angle, and Product-Sum Formulas 24 Feb. 9 Feb. 10 Unit 3: 8.4 Basic Trigonometric Equations 25 Feb. 10 Feb. 10 Discussion 4 (iCollege) 26 Feb. 13 Feb. 17 Unit 3: 8.5 More Trigonometric Equations 27 Feb. 16 Feb. 17 Unit 3: 10.1 Vectors in Two Dimensions 28 Feb. 16 Feb. 17 Discussion 5 (iCollege) 29 Feb. 16 Feb. 17 Quiz 4 (WebAssign) 30 Feb. 17 Feb. 17 Test 2 (WebAssign) 31 Feb. 19 Feb. 26 Unit 4: 4.6 Rational Functions 32 Feb. 20 Feb. 26 Unit 4: 12.1 Parabolas 33 Feb. 20 Feb. 26 Unit 4: 12.2 Ellipses 34 Feb. 23 Feb. 26 Unit 4: 12.3 Hyperbolas 35 Feb. 25 Feb. 26 Discussion 6 (iCollege) 36 Feb. 25 Mar. 3 Unit 4: 11.8 Systems of Nonlinear Equations 37 Feb. 26 Mar. 3 Unit 4: 13.1 Sequences and Summation Notation 38 Feb. 26 Review for Final 39 Feb. 26 Mar. 3 Discussion 7 (iCollege) 40 Feb. 26 Mar. 3 Quiz 5 (WebAssign) 41 Feb. 26 Mar. 3 Quiz 6 (WebAssign) 42 Mar. 2 - 3 Mar. 3 Proctored Final Exam (iCollege) Jan. 12 Full and first half term classes begin Jan. 19 No classes – MLK Day Feb. 5 Midpoint for first half classes Feb. 24 No classes – Student Study Day Feb. 26 Last day for first half classes Mar. 2 – 4 Finals for first half/Midterms for full semester TEXTBOOK HOMEWORK: Below are additional problems from the textbook which may be completed for additional practice. Algebra Review: Chapter 3 Functions Textbook Problems Section 3.1 What is a function? 23, 36, 41, 47-57 odd Section 3.2 Graphing of Functions 13, 19, 57, 59 Section 3.4 Average Rate of Change of a Function 9, 11, 13, 15 Section 3.5 Transformations of Functions 37-59 odd, 60, 75, 77, 79 Section 3.6 Combining Functions 21-25 odd, 33-41 odd Section 3.7 One-to-One Functions and Inverses 11, 13, 15, 37, 41, 51, 55, 61 Precalculus Topics: Chapter 4 Polynomial and Rational Functions Section 4.6 Rational Functions 7-10 all, 15, 16, 21, 25, 37, 41, 51, 55, 61, 83, 84, 85 Chapter 6 Trigonometric Functions: Right Triangle Approach Textbook Problems Section 6.1 Angle Measure 1-59 odd, 71, 74 Section 6.2 Trigonometry of Right Triangles 1-23 odd, 31-37 odd, 41, 47, 50, 51, 53, 55, 56, 63 Section 6.3 Trigonometric Functions of Angles 3-37 odd, 45-51 odd, 54, 55 Section 6.4 Inverse Trigonometric Functions and Triangles 1-35 odd, 37-40 all Section 6.5 The Law of Sines 1-27 odd, 33-43 odd Section 6.6 The Law of Cosines 1-27 odd, 39-51 odd Chapter 7 Trigonometric Functions: Unit Circle Approach Section 7.1 The Unit Circle 1–51 odd Section 7.2 Trigonometric Functions of Real Numbers 3–23 odd, 29–37 odd, 51, 53, 65–71 odd Section 7.3 Trigonometric Graphs 1–49 odd, 77, 79 Section 7.4 More Trigonometric Graphs (Transformations optional) 3–37 odd, 39–53 odd (optional) Section 7.5 Inverse Trigonometric Functions and Their Graphs 1–43 odd Chapter 8 Analytic Trigonometry Section 8.1 Trigonometric Identities 1-59 odd, 62, 64, 66, 68, 78, 79, 91 – 96 all Section 8.2 Addition and Subtraction Formulas 1-20 all, 21, 23, 25, 31, 33, 34 Section 8.3 Double-Angle, Half-Angle, and Product-Sum Formulas 1-10 all, 29, 30, 31, 73, 74, 75 Only the Double-Angle formulas in Section 8.3 are required. Section 8.4 Basic Trigonometric Equations 5 – 55 odd Section 8.5 More Trigonometric Equations 3, 7, 11, 17-25 odd, 43, 63 See Supplement below titled “Solving Trigonometric Equations.” Chapter 10 Vectors in Two and Three Dimensions Section 10.1 Vectors in Two Dimensions 9-53 odd Chapter 11 Systems of Equations and Inequalities Section 11.8 Systems of Nonlinear Equations 3-29 odd, 33, 34 Chapter 12 Conic Sections Section 12.1 Parabolas 5-27 odd Section 12.2 Ellipses 5-24 all, 29-32 all, 45-47 all Section 12.3 Hyperbolas 5-20 all, 27-30 all Chapter 13 Sequences and Series Section 13.1 Sequences and Summation Notation 3-47 odd, 55-67 odd This syllabus is subject to change at the instructor's discretion. All changes to the course will be announced in iCollege and all students are responsible for keeping track of such changes.



VIEW FILE
Thread: For this assignment you will use the Project 2 Excel Spreadsheet to answer the
Posted On: Oct. 31, 2017
Author: Shipra


DISCUSSION BOARD 1/PROJECT 2 INSTRUCTIONS Standard Deviation and Outliers Thread: For this assignment you will use the Project 2 Excel Spreadsheet to answer the questions below. Use the spreadsheet to create the graphs as described in each question and then answer the question. Put all of your answers into a post in the Project 2 Discussion Board Forum. This course will be utilizing the Post-First feature. You will not be able to see your classmates’ posts until after you have made your own post. This is intentional. You must use your own work for answers to questions 1–5. If something happens that leads you to want to make a 2nd post for any of your answers to questions 1–5, you must get permission from your instructor. 1. a) Create a set of 5 points that are very close together and record the standard deviation. Next, add a 6th point that is far away from the original 5 and record the new standard deviation. What is the impact of the new point on the standard deviation? Do not just give a numerical value for the change. Explain what happened to the standard deviation in words. (4 points) b) Create a data set with 8 points in it that has a mean of approximately 10 and a standard deviation of approximately 1. Use the 2nd chart to create a second data set with 8 points that has a mean of approximately 10 and a standard deviation of approximately 4. What did you do differently to create the data set with the larger standard deviation? (4 points) 2. Go back to the spreadsheet and clear the data values from question 1 from the data column and then put values matching the following data set into the data column for the first graph. (8 points) 50, 50, 50, 50, 50. Notice that the standard deviation is 0. Explain why the standard deviation for this one is zero. Do not show the calculation. Explain in words why the standard deviation is zero when all of the points are the same. If you don’t know why, try doing the calculation by hand to see what is happening. If that does not make it clear, try doing a little research on standard deviation and see what it is measuring and then look again at the data set for this question. 3. Go back to the spreadsheet one last time and put each of the following three data sets into one of the graphs. Record what the standard deviation is for each data set and answer the questions below. Data set 1: 0, 25, 50, 75, 100 Data set 2: 30, 40, 50, 60, 70 Data set 3: 40, 45, 50, 55, 60 Note that all three data sets have a median of 50. Notice how spread out the points are in each data set and compare this to the standard deviations for the data sets. Describe the relationship you see between the amount of spread and the size of the standard deviation and explain why this connection exists. Do not give your calculations in your answer — explain in words. (8 points) For the last 2 questions, use the Project 1 Data set that is found in Course Content >> Syllabus and Assignment Instructions >> Assignment Instructions in Blackboard. 4. Explain what an outlier is. Then, if there are any outliers in the Project 1 Data Set, what are they? If there are no outliers, say no outliers. (4 points) 5. Which 4 temperatures in the data set look to be the most questionable or the most unrealistic to you? Explain why you selected these 4 points. (4 points) Replies: After you have made your post, you will be able to see your classmates’ posts. Find 2 classmates who disagreed with at least some part of at least one of your answers to questions 4 and 5 and explain why your answers are correct. If after reading some of your classmates’ posts, you change your mind about the right answers for questions 4 and 5, explain what you were thinking originally as well as what you think now and why. (8 points) Submit your answers to these questions by 11:59 p.m. (ET) on Saturday of Module/Week 3. Submit your 2 replies of at least 50 words each by 11:59 p.m. (ET) on Monday of Module/Week 3.



VIEW FILE
Math Discussion 1 Helen Chaney 3/21/2012 12:13:25 PM Part 1 1. In your own words, define the word “function”. A function in mathematics is the association of elements of sets that are r...
Posted On: Oct. 31, 2017
Author: Shipra


Discussion 1 Helen Chaney 3/21/2012 12:13:25 PM Part 1 1. In your own words, define the word “function”. A function in mathematics is the association of elements of sets that are related to each element in a given set. 2. Give example of functions using a set of at least 4 ordered pairs. The domain will be any four integers between -12 and 5. {(2,-7) (4,-8), (6-9) (7-3). This is a function because the elements in each set are ordered pairs. 3. This is a function because the elements in each set are ordered pairs. They also are relative to each element in the set. 4. Give your own example of at least four ordered pairs that does not model a function. 5. {(7,-1)(3,-2)(11,-3) (0,-2) 6. Explain why the examples do not model a function. They are not functions because the elements in each set do not match have relations in each set. Comments: The definition of function looks incomplete. So probably that needs a correction. The above given examples in question is totally function and as I earlier said as well, the student may not have understood the meaning of function. Probably that’s the reason for incomplete definition and examples shown as not functions are actually functions. Part 2 Select any two integers between -12 and +12 which will become solutions to a system of two equations. 3 and 9 Write two equations that have your two integers as solutions. Show how you built the equations using your integers. x+y=3 x=3and y=0 2.ax+y=9 Solve your system of equations by the addition/subtraction method. Make sure you show the necessary 5 steps. Use the example on page 426 of Mathematics in Our World as a guide. 4. Respond to at least two of your classmates’ postings. Do you agree or disagree that their examples model functions? Follow their 5 steps. Do their calculations follow the correct rules of algebra? 5. I picked the numbers 3 and 9 First equation –x+y=3 X=3 and y=0 Second equation is ax+y=9 Since y=9 Comments: The student has got it totally wrong here. I guess the question is not even understood because it was asked to have 3 and 9 as the solution where in the student is having 3 and 0 as the solution. There is a fair amount of chance of the question not even being understood then forget about answering it. Anthony Rossetti 3/22/2012 2:08:19 PM Part 1 A function is a form of a pattern/equation, which each coordinate has a corresponding coordinate. Example of a function: (1, 5), (2, 4), (3,2), (4,1). This example models a function because each y and x coordinate has a single value. Example that is not a function: (0,3), (1, 2), (3, 5), (3, 6). This example is not a function because the y coordinate has two values at the same time. Part 2 My two integers are 3 and 6. First equation is x+y= 3 x=2 and y=1 Second equation is ax+y=6 Since y=1 and x=2 then a=2.5 Comment: The definition is right but incomplete. I think the student has understood the concept behind functions but the expressive ability is a little low. Though the function definition is marginally incomplete, at the same time the examples given are good but their explanation again is a little here and there. It should actually be that there is a x coordinate which has two y values. So the understanding is pretty much there but the expression of that is missing. Disucssion 2 Katie Poling 3/22/2012 8:28:04 PM 1. The room I am going to measure is the bedroom. The length of the bedroom is 14ft by 6 inches. The width of the bedroom is 12ft by 6 inches. The height is 8 ft. Length: 14 ft 6 inches= 174 inches Width: 12 ft 6 inches=150inches Height: 8 ft=96 inches 2. The formula for surface area is 2(LxW)+2(LxH)+2(WxH) 2(174x150)+ 2(174x96)+2(150x96) 2(26100)+2(16704)+2(14400) 52200+33408+28800=114,408 square inches Multiplying the LxW two times is because of the floor and the ceiling. Since we don’t paint the floor, we multiply 174x150 and subtract it from the total square inches. 174x150=26100 114,408-26100=88,308 3. In order to figure how much paint will be needed I will take 88,308 and divide it by 12 square feet (144). I will then divide that number by 350 and will get the total amount of gallons. 88,308/144=613.25 613.25/350=1.75 I will need 2 gallons of paint. 4. In order to figure out how much it will cost to paint the room I need to multiply the amount per gallon by two and then multiply the total by 8% and then I add it to the total amount per gallon. 22.95x2=45.90 45.90x.08=3.67 45.90+3.67=49.57 5. In order to figure out the total centimeters I multiply the inches by 2.54 (the equivalent in centimeters to one inch). Length: 174x2.54=441.96 cm Width:150x2.54=381cm Height:96x2.54=243.84cm 6. The formula to find the volume is lwh. You multiply the lengthxwidthxheight in centimeters. 441.96x381x243.84=41059427.5584 cubic cm 7. In order to find the volume doubled, I multiply all the lwh in cm by 2 and then divide it by the lwh without being doubled. l=441.96(2)=883.92 w=381(2)=762 h=243.84(2)=487.68 883.92x762x487.68=328475420.4672 328475420.4672/41059427.5584=8 The volume would be 8x bigger if each of the dimensions were doubled. Comment: The concept is understood and the formula used is correct. The surface area formula used is correct which I have hardly seen in other people. Other than that, it is very sensible of the student to remove the floor from the calculation as it will not be painted. The overall concept is right though I haven’t checked the calculations so there might be a mistake from that end but I would reframe myself from saying on that. Deborah Foster 3/22/2012 10:06:14 PM 1. The area of my room is: Length: 12 feet, 4 inches Width: 10 feet, 6 inches Height: 9 feet, 3 inches To convert feet to inches: (1 foot = 12 inches, square foot = 144 inches) X * 12 + Y = Z X= # of feet, Y = # of inches, Z = total inches Length: 148 inches (12*12+4=148) Width: 126 inches (10*12+6=126) Height: 111 inches (9*12+3=111) 2. 2. To find the Surface Area of the room: Surface Area formula = 2LW + 2LH + 2WH 2(148 x 126) + 2(148 x 111) + 2(126 x 111) = 2(18648) + 2(16428) + 2(13986) = 98124 Surface Area in square inches To convert back to feet: 98124/144=681 sq feet 3. The area to paint does not include the ceiling or the floor (top and bottom). Subtracting the area of the base (2(148*126) = 37296) square inches (259 sq feet). The area to paint is 60828 square inches (98124sq ft-37296 sq ft = 60828 or 681 sq ft – 259 sq ft = 422). Converting 60828 square inches to square feet (60828/144 = 422 square feet). 422sq ft / 350sq ft = 1.2 gallons, rounded up to 2 gallons, because I can’t leave unpainted areas. 4. To determine the cost: 22.95*2*(1.08) = 49.57 To check answer: (22.95 + 22.95 = 45.90) (45.90 * 1.08 = 49.57) 5. Conversion to centimeters: Length: 148 inches, (148*2.54=375.92 centimeters) Width: 126 inches, (126*2.54=320.04 centimeters) Height: 111 inches, (111*2.54=281.94 centimeters 6. To find volume of space: in centimeters V=LWH V=375.92*320.04*281.94 =33920042.61 cubic centimeters To convert back to square inches 33920042.61/2.54=13354347.48 inches To convert back to square feet 13354347.48/144=92738.52 7. To double the volume increases the size of the room by 8, which is the 2*2*2 of the formula. (V=2(375.92)*2(320.04)*2(281.94) = 271360340.9) or 33920042.61/271360340.9=8 Comment: The concept is understood and the formula used is correct. The surface area formula used is correct which I have hardly seen in other people. Other than that, it is very sensible of the student to remove the floor from the calculation as it will not be painted but the student has overdone his efforts here by removing the ceiling as well from painting. Where in the world is the ceiling not painted is a general question and moreover it is important that the student understands this thing from here. The student in not just learning maths but moreover an application in real life and some basic things about life like ceiling are painted. So this course and particularly this discussion has helped in that sense. The overall concept is right though I haven’t checked the calculations so there might be a mistake from that end but I would reframe myself from saying on that.



VIEW FILE
Thread: For this assignment you will use the Project 2 Excel Spreadsheet to answer the
Posted On: Oct. 30, 2017
Author: Shipra


DISCUSSION BOARD 1/PROJECT 2 INSTRUCTIONS Standard Deviation and Outliers Thread: For this assignment you will use the Project 2 Excel Spreadsheet to answer the questions below. Use the spreadsheet to create the graphs as described in each question and then answer the question. Put all of your answers into a post in the Project 2 Discussion Board Forum. This course will be utilizing the Post-First feature. You will not be able to see your classmates’ posts until after you have made your own post. This is intentional. You must use your own work for answers to questions 1–5. If something happens that leads you to want to make a 2nd post for any of your answers to questions 1–5, you must get permission from your instructor. 1. a) Create a set of 5 points that are very close together and record the standard deviation. Next, add a 6th point that is far away from the original 5 and record the new standard deviation. What is the impact of the new point on the standard deviation? Do not just give a numerical value for the change. Explain what happened to the standard deviation in words. (4 points) b) Create a data set with 8 points in it that has a mean of approximately 10 and a standard deviation of approximately 1. Use the 2nd chart to create a second data set with 8 points that has a mean of approximately 10 and a standard deviation of approximately 4. What did you do differently to create the data set with the larger standard deviation? (4 points) 2. Go back to the spreadsheet and clear the data values from question 1 from the data column and then put values matching the following data set into the data column for the first graph. (8 points) 50, 50, 50, 50, 50. Notice that the standard deviation is 0. Explain why the standard deviation for this one is zero. Do not show the calculation. Explain in words why the standard deviation is zero when all of the points are the same. If you don’t know why, try doing the calculation by hand to see what is happening. If that does not make it clear, try doing a little research on standard deviation and see what it is measuring and then look again at the data set for this question. 3. Go back to the spreadsheet one last time and put each of the following three data sets into one of the graphs. Record what the standard deviation is for each data set and answer the questions below. Data set 1: 0, 25, 50, 75, 100 Data set 2: 30, 40, 50, 60, 70 Data set 3: 40, 45, 50, 55, 60 Note that all three data sets have a median of 50. Notice how spread out the points are in each data set and compare this to the standard deviations for the data sets. Describe the relationship you see between the amount of spread and the size of the standard deviation and explain why this connection exists. Do not give your calculations in your answer — explain in words. (8 points) For the last 2 questions, use the Project 1 Data set that is found in Course Content >> Syllabus and Assignment Instructions >> Assignment Instructions in Blackboard. 4. Explain what an outlier is. Then, if there are any outliers in the Project 1 Data Set, what are they? If there are no outliers, say no outliers. (4 points) 5. Which 4 temperatures in the data set look to be the most questionable or the most unrealistic to you? Explain why you selected these 4 points. (4 points) Replies: After you have made your post, you will be able to see your classmates’ posts. Find 2 classmates who disagreed with at least some part of at least one of your answers to questions 4 and 5 and explain why your answers are correct. If after reading some of your classmates’ posts, you change your mind about the right answers for questions 4 and 5, explain what you were thinking originally as well as what you think now and why. (8 points) Submit your answers to these questions by 11:59 p.m. (ET) on Saturday of Module/Week 3. Submit your 2 replies of at least 50 words each by 11:59 p.m. (ET) on Monday of Module/Week 3.



VIEW FILE
Answer: What are Bonds? Bonds are defined as a long term contract under which a borrower promish to make payments of interest and principle to bond holder on a specific date. How is the value of...
Posted On: Oct. 28, 2017
Author: Shipra


Answer: What are Bonds? Bonds are defined as a long term contract under which a borrower promish to make payments of interest and principle to bond holder on a specific date. How is the value of a bond calculated? Where, What is the yield to maturity (YTM)? The yield to maturity is defined as the return an investor gets from a bond when he/she held the bond till maturity. Where, Yield to maturity can be used to value a bond by using YTM as discounted rate of return for the bond valuation. Compare the Eurobond to US government bonds Similarities: 1. Both the bonds can be redeemed at maturity. 2. Both have a fixed coupon rate. 3. Both are tradable in the money market. Difference: 1. US government bond are risk free bonds where as Eurobonds are exposed to exchange rate risk. 2. Euro bonds are defined as bonds that are issued in one country but are denominated in the currency of some other country whereas US government bonds are issued in US and denominated in US currency dollar. 3. US government bonds can only issued by US government, whereas Euro dollars are issued by companies to hedge there exchange rate risk. 1. Answer: The nominal Yield for this bond is = (2*175/5000)*100= (250/5000)*100=5% 2. Answer: 3. Answer: As we know that, Or, As, this is an annual coupon interest payment, the interest receive every six month=$69.01/2=$34.55 Or, interest received for$10,000 bond=$34.55*10=$345.50



VIEW FILE
MATH INEQUALITIES SOLUSION
Posted On: Oct. 28, 2017
Author: Shipra


MATH INEQUALITIES SOLUTION



VIEW FILE
INSTRUCTIONS: Answer all questions. Each one is worth 10 marks in total. Write your name and student number on the cover page. Put page numbers on each page submitted. Show the formulas you use, b...
Posted On: Oct. 28, 2017
Author: Shipra


INSTRUCTIONS: Answer all questions. Each one is worth 10 marks in total. Write your name and student number on the cover page. Put page numbers on each page submitted. Show the formulas you use, but you may use a computer to do the calculations.



VIEW FILE
blume model assignment writing Recent Questions.docx
Posted On: Oct. 23, 2017
Author: Shipra


1) 2) 3) 4)



VIEW FILE