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Homework Assignment Chapter-1 E3 I will not purchase the shares as it is unethical. Taking advantage of rank
Posted On: Nov. 22, 2017
Author: Shipra


Homework Assignment Chapter-1 E3 I will not purchase the shares as it is unethical. Taking advantage of rank directly or indirectly for self is illegal and therefore it should be prohibited. I would not like to take advantage of this situation. Quitting is not the solution of the problem. I would first like to take initiative to control the quality of the product and inform the company to take necessary actions. If company is involved in such activities then I will inform the relevant government regulatory to take appropriate actions. Chapter-2 P2 M1 = Currency + Traveler’s checks + Demand deposits + Other checkable deposits = $700 billion + $10 billion + 300 billion + 300 billion = $1,310 billion P5 M1 = Traveler’s checks + Coin & Paper currency + Demand deposits = $1 million + $30 million + $25 million = $56 million M2 = M1 + Retail money market mutual funds + Saving account at depository institutions + Small denominating time deposits = $56 million + $60 million + $35 million = $151 million M3 = M2 + Repurchase agreement & Eurodollars + Large denomination time deposits + Institutional money market mutual funds = $151 million + $15 million + $50 million + $65 million = $281 million Chapter -3 P1 Calculation of amount of interest paid Loan A = $120,000 × 7% = $8,400 Loan B = $110,000 × 6% = $6,600 Loan C = $130,000 × 6.5% = $8,450 Amount of net proceeds calculation Loan A = $120,000 - $8,400 = $111,600 Loan B = $110,000 - $6,600 = $103,400 Loan C = $130,000 - $8,450 = $121,550 Loan C will provide the most upfront money. Calculation of effective cost or interest rate Loan A = (8,400)/(111,600) × 100 = 7.53% Loan B = (6,600)/(103,400) × 100 = 6.38% Loan C = (8,450)/(121,550) × 100 = 6.95% Loan B has the lowest cost. P5 Total Assets = Vault cash + U.S. Government Securities + Cash items in process of collection + Loans to Individuals + Loans secured by real estate + Bank premises $2 million + $5million + $4 million + $7 million + $9 million + $11 million = $38 million Total Liabilities = Demand deposits + Nontransactional accounts + Federal funds purchase = $13 million + $20 million + $4 million = $37 million Owner’s Capital Account = Total assets – Total liabilities = $38 million - $37 million = $1 million



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Week-3 Homework Assignment Chapter-9 P6 Present value = Future Value × Present Value Interest Factor(PVIF) = $5,000 × .614 = $3,070 Present Value = Future Value × PVIF = $5,000 × .623 = $3,...
Posted On: Nov. 22, 2017
Author: Shipra


Week-3 Homework Assignment Chapter-9 P6 Present value = Future Value × Present Value Interest Factor(PVIF) = $5,000 × .614 = $3,070 Present Value = Future Value × PVIF = $5,000 × .623 = $3,115 Present Value = Future Value × PVIF = $5,000 × .708 = $3,540 Chapter-10 P22 Value of Preferred Stock = (Dividend paid)/(Rate of Return) = $4.50/(.14) = $32.14 P23 Value of Stock = Dividend/(Nominal return+Risk premium) = $3.00/(.04+ .06) = $3.00/(.10) = $30 P24 Value of the Stock = ($1.30 ×1.05)/(0.12-0.05) = $1.365/(.07) = $19.5 Value of the Stock = ($1.30 ×1.05)/(0.15-0.05) = $1.365/(.10) = $13.65 As the required rate of return is increasing, the stock prices are declining.



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HOME DEPOT INC. Scroll to the right to see the notes! Formula 2013 (Fin. Stmts. ended 2/3/2014) "2013
Posted On: Nov. 21, 2017
Author: Shipra


HOME DEPOT INC. Scroll to the right to see the notes! Formula 2013 (Fin. Stmts. ended 2/3/2014) "2013 Results" 2012 (Fin. Stmts. ended 2/3/2013) Industry Averages LIQUIDITY AND SOLVENCY ratios Current Ratio Current Assets #DIV/0! $15,372 1.34 1.42 Current Liabilities $11,462 Quick (Acid Test) Ratio Quick Assets #DIV/0! $3,889 0.34 0.42 Current Liabilities $11,462 Number of Days' Sales in Inventory (also called Days in Inventory--DII) Average Inventory #DIV/0! $10,517.50 78.49 83.14 Average Daily COGS $134.01 Inventory Turnover 365 #DIV/0! 365 4.65 4.39 DII 78.49 Number of Days' Sales in Receivables (also called Days Sales Outstanding--DSO) Average Accounts Receivable #DIV/0! $1,320.00 6.45 7.48 Average Daily Sales $204.81 Accounts Receivable Turnover 365 #DIV/0! 365 56.59 48.81 DSO 6.45 Days Payable Outstanding (DPO) "Average Accounts Payable" #DIV/0! $5,116.00 38.18 30.00 Average Daily COGS $134.01 "Cash Conversion Cycle (You will have to enter the formula or the answer in D19.)" DII + DSO - DPO 78.5 + 6.4 - 38.2 46.70 60.62 "Ratio of Fixed Assets to Long-Term Liabilities" Fixed Assets (net) #DIV/0! $24,069 2.03 1.80 Long-Term Liabilities $11,845 Ratio of Liabilities to Stockholders' Equity Total Liabilities #DIV/0! $23,307 1.31 1.97 Total Stockholders' Equity $17,777 PROFITABILITY ratios Gross Profit Margin Gross Profit #DIV/0! $25,842 34.57% 34.69% Net Sales $74,754 Operating Profit Margin Operating Income #DIV/0! $7,766 10.39% 9.80% Net Sales $74,754 Net Profit Margin Net Income #DIV/0! $4,535 6.07% 6.22% Net Sales $74,754 Ratio of Net Sales to Assets (also called Asset Turnover) Net Sales #DIV/0! $74,754 1.83 1.78 Average Total Assets $40,801.00 Rate Earned on Total Assets (also called Return on Assets--ROA) Net Income + Interest Expense #DIV/0! $5,167 12.66% 11.06% Average Total Assets $40,801.00 Rate Earned on Stockholders' Equity (also called Return on Equity) Net Income #DIV/0! $4,535 25.42% 29.14% Average Total Stockholders' Equity $17,837.50 Earnings per Share on Common Stock Net Income - Preferred Dividends #DIV/0! $4,535 $3.03 Weighted Avg. Shares of Common Stock Outstanding 1,499 Price-Earnings (P/E) Ratio Market Price per Share of Common Stock #DIV/0! $67.30 22.21 22.27 Earnings per Share on Common Stock $3.03 Dividends per Share Dividends #DIV/0! $1,743 $1.16 "Weighted Avg. Shares of Common Stock Outstanding" 1,499 Dividend Yield Dividends per Share of Common Stock #DIV/0! $1.16 1.72% 1.70% Market Price per Share of Common Stock $67.30



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HOME DEPOT INC. Scroll to the right to see the notes! ...
Posted On: Nov. 21, 2017
Author: Shipra


HOME DEPOT INC. Scroll to the right to see the notes! Formula 2013 (Fin. Stmts. ended 2/2/2014) "2013 HOME DEPOT INC. Scroll to the right to see the notes! Formula 2013 (Fin. Stmts. ended 2/2/2014) "2013 Results" 2012 (Fin. Stmts. ended 2/3/2013) Industry Averages LIQUIDITY AND SOLVENCY ratios Current Ratio Current Assets #DIV/0! $15,372 1.34 1.42 Current Liabilities $11,462 Quick (Acid Test) Ratio Quick Assets #DIV/0! $3,889 0.34 0.42 Current Liabilities $11,462 Number of Days' Sales in Inventory (also called Days in Inventory--DII) Average Inventory #DIV/0! $10,517.50 78.49 83.14 Average Daily COGS $134.01 Inventory Turnover 365 #DIV/0! 365 4.65 4.39 DII 78.49 Number of Days' Sales in Receivables (also called Days Sales Outstanding--DSO) Average Accounts Receivable #DIV/0! $1,320.00 6.45 7.48 Average Daily Sales $204.81 Accounts Receivable Turnover 365 #DIV/0! 365 56.59 48.81 DSO 6.45 Days Payable Outstanding (DPO) "Average Accounts Payable" #DIV/0! $5,116.00 38.18 30.00 Average Daily COGS $134.01 "Cash Conversion Cycle (You will have to enter the formula or the answer in D19.)" DII + DSO - DPO 78.5 + 6.4 - 38.2 46.70 60.62 "Ratio of Fixed Assets to Long-Term Liabilities" Fixed Assets (net) #DIV/0! $24,069 2.03 1.80 Long-Term Liabilities $11,845 Ratio of Liabilities to Stockholders' Equity Total Liabilities #DIV/0! $23,307 1.31 1.97 Total Stockholders' Equity $17,777 PROFITABILITY ratios Gross Profit Margin Gross Profit #DIV/0! $25,842 34.57% 34.69% Net Sales $74,754 Operating Profit Margin Operating Income #DIV/0! $7,766 10.39% 9.80% Net Sales $74,754 Net Profit Margin Net Income #DIV/0! $4,535 6.07% 6.22% Net Sales $74,754 Ratio of Net Sales to Assets (also called Asset Turnover) Net Sales #DIV/0! $74,754 1.83 1.78 Average Total Assets $40,801.00 Rate Earned on Total Assets (also called Return on Assets--ROA) Net Income + Interest Expense #DIV/0! $5,167 12.66% 11.06% Average Total Assets $40,801.00 Rate Earned on Stockholders' Equity (also called Return on Equity) Net Income #DIV/0! $4,535 25.42% 29.14% Average Total Stockholders' Equity $17,837.50 Earnings per Share on Common Stock Net Income - Preferred Dividends $0.00 $4,535 $3.03 Weighted Avg. Shares of Common Stock Outstanding 1,425 1,499 Price-Earnings (P/E) Ratio Market Price per Share of Common Stock $75.09 #DIV/0! $67.30 22.21 22.27 Earnings per Share on Common Stock $3.03 Dividends per Share Dividends $2,243 $1.57 $1,743 $1.16 "Weighted Avg. Shares of Common Stock Outstanding" 1,425 1,499 Dividend Yield Dividends per Share of Common Stock $1.57 2.09% $1.16 1.72% 1.70% Market Price per Share of Common Stock $75.09 $67.30 Results" 2012 (Fin. Stmts. ended 2/3/2013) Industry Averages LIQUIDITY AND SOLVENCY ratios Current Ratio Current Assets #DIV/0! $15,372 1.34 1.42 Current Liabilities $11,462 Quick (Acid Test) Ratio Quick Assets #DIV/0! $3,889 0.34 0.42 Current Liabilities $11,462 Number of Days' Sales in Inventory (also called Days in Inventory--DII) Average Inventory #DIV/0! $10,517.50 78.49 83.14 Average Daily COGS $134.01 Inventory Turnover 365 #DIV/0! 365 4.65 4.39 DII 78.49 Number of Days' Sales in Receivables (also called Days Sales Outstanding--DSO) Average Accounts Receivable #DIV/0! $1,320.00 6.45 7.48 Average Daily Sales $204.81 Accounts Receivable Turnover 365 #DIV/0! 365 56.59 48.81 DSO 6.45 Days Payable Outstanding (DPO) "Average Accounts Payable" #DIV/0! $5,116.00 38.18 30.00 Average Daily COGS $134.01 "Cash Conversion Cycle (You will have to enter the formula or the answer in D19.)" DII + DSO - DPO 78.5 + 6.4 - 38.2 46.70 60.62 "Ratio of Fixed Assets to Long-Term Liabilities" Fixed Assets (net) #DIV/0! $24,069 2.03 1.80 Long-Term Liabilities $11,845 Ratio of Liabilities to Stockholders' Equity Total Liabilities #DIV/0! $23,307 1.31 1.97 Total Stockholders' Equity $17,777 PROFITABILITY ratios Gross Profit Margin Gross Profit #DIV/0! $25,842 34.57% 34.69% Net Sales $74,754 Operating Profit Margin Operating Income #DIV/0! $7,766 10.39% 9.80% Net Sales $74,754 Net Profit Margin Net Income #DIV/0! $4,535 6.07% 6.22% Net Sales $74,754 Ratio of Net Sales to Assets (also called Asset Turnover) Net Sales #DIV/0! $74,754 1.83 1.78 Average Total Assets $40,801.00 Rate Earned on Total Assets (also called Return on Assets--ROA) Net Income + Interest Expense #DIV/0! $5,167 12.66% 11.06% Average Total Assets $40,801.00 Rate Earned on Stockholders' Equity (also called Return on Equity) Net Income #DIV/0! $4,535 25.42% 29.14% Average Total Stockholders' Equity $17,837.50 Earnings per Share on Common Stock Net Income - Preferred Dividends $0.00 $4,535 $3.03 Weighted Avg. Shares of Common Stock Outstanding 1,425 1,499 Price-Earnings (P/E) Ratio Market Price per Share of Common Stock $75.09 #DIV/0! $67.30 22.21 22.27 Earnings per Share on Common Stock $3.03 Dividends per Share Dividends $2,243 $1.57 $1,743 $1.16 "Weighted Avg. Shares of Common Stock Outstanding" 1,425 1,499 Dividend Yield Dividends per Share of Common Stock $1.57 2.09% $1.16 1.72% 1.70% Market Price per Share of Common Stock $75.09 $67.30



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THE HOME DEPOT, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS amounts in millions, except share and per share data "February 2, 2014" "February 3,
Posted On: Nov. 21, 2017
Author: Shipra


THE HOME DEPOT, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS amounts in millions, except share and per share data "February 2, 2014" "February 3, 2013" Increase (Decrease) ASSETS Amount Percent Amount Percent Amount Percent Current Assets Cash and cash equivalents $1,929 $2,494 6.07% Receivables, net 1,398 1,395 3.40% Merchandise Inventories 11,057 10,710 26.07% Other Current Assets 895 773 1.88% Total Current Assets 15,279 37.71% 15,372 37.42% (93) (0.60%) Property and Equipment, at cost Land 8,375 20.67% 8,485 20.65% (110) (1.30%) Buildings 17,950 44.30% 17,981 43.77% (31) (0.17%) Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment 10,107 24.94% 9,338 22.73% 769 8.24% Leasehold Improvements 1,388 3.43% 1,382 3.36% 6 0.43% Construction in Progress 548 1.35% 647 1.57% (99) (15.30%) Capital Leases 696 1.72% 658 1.60% 38 5.78% Total Property and Equipment, at cost 39,064 96.41% 38,491 93.69% 573 1.49% Less Accumulated Depreciation 15,716 38.79% 14,422 35.10% 1,294 8.97% Net Property and Equipment 23,348 57.62% 24,069 58.58% (721) (3.00%) Other Long-Term Assets Notes Receivable - 0.00% 140 0.34% (140) (100.00%) Goodwill 1,289 3.18% 1,170 2.85% 119 10.17% Other Assets 602 1.49% 333 0.81% 269 80.78% TOTAL ASSETS $40,518 100.00% $41,084 100.00% $(566) (1.38%) LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY Current Liabilities Accounts Payable $5,797 14.31% $5,376 13.09% $421 7.83% Accrued Salaries and Related Expenses 1,428 3.52% 1,414 3.44% 14 0.99% Sales Taxes Payable 396 0.98% 472 1.15% (76) (16.10%) Deferred Revenue 1,337 3.30% 1,270 3.09% 67 5.28% Income Taxes Payable 12 0.03% 22 0.05% (10) (45.45%) Current Installments of Long-Term Debt 33 0.08% 1,321 3.22% (1,288) (97.50%) Other Accrued Expenses 1,746 4.31% 1,587 3.86% 159 10.02% Total Current Liabilities 10,749 26.53% 11,462 27.90% (713) (6.22%) Long-Term Debt, excluding current installments 14,691 36.26% 9,475 23.06% 5,216 55.05% Other Long-Term Liabilities 2,042 5.04% 2,051 4.99% (9) (0.44%) Deferred Income Taxes 514 1.27% 319 0.78% 195 61.13% Total Liabilities 27,996 69.10% 23,307 56.73% 4,689 20.12% STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY Common stock, par value $0.05; authorized: 10 billion shares; issued: 1.754 billion shares at February 3, 2013 and 1.733 billion shares at January 29, 2012; outstanding: 1.484 billion shares at February 3, 2013 and 1.537 billion shares at January 29, 2012 88 0.22% 88 0.21% - 0.00% Paid-In Capital in Excess of Par 8,402 20.74% 7,948 19.35% 454 5.71% Retained Earnings 23,180 57.21% 20,038 48.77% 3,142 15.68% Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income 46 0.11% 397 0.97% (351) (88.41%) Treasury stock, at cost, 196 million shares at January 29, 2012 and 99 million shares at January 30, 2011 (19,194) (47.37%) (10,694) (26.03%) (8,500) 79.48% Total Stockholders’ Equity 12,522 30.90% 17,777 43.27% (5,255) (29.56%) TOTAL LIABILITIES & STOCKHOLDERS' EQUITY $40,518 100.00% $41,084 100.00% $(566) (1.38%) See accompanying Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.



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The Calendar for the assignments Note a: There are 3 type of assignments for each chapter (Some chapters have only two assignments), and they are:
Posted On: Nov. 21, 2017
Author: Shipra


The Calendar for the assignments Note a: There are 3 type of assignments for each chapter (Some chapters have only two assignments), and they are: 1) Exercises and Problems, 2) Analysis Questions, and 3) Concepts Check. Note b: 1. You may print the assignments for Exercises and Problems and Analysis Questions from each chapter section. 2. Concepts Check has no options to print. Each of them just like a quiz with unlimited time. 3. Each assignment must meets the deadline. There is no makeup for late submission. If an assignment missed the particular due time, then, there is no other chance to submit it whatsoever. Therefore, No MISSING submissions will be accepted whatsoever. 4. No “Reflection Essay” is needed for you. 5. Please see the Course Calendar in the next page. Deadlines are always 11:55pm. All items can be submitted any day and time prior to the deadlines indicated below. Begin each module well before deadline days. ADMG 302.A01/A02 Tentative Schedule – Spring 2014 Sunday Mon Tues Wed Thursday Fri Sat Apr 2 MODULE 0 in Canvas 3 MODULE 0 in Canvas 4 MODULE 0 in Canvas Due: Discussions #1 and #2 initial posts in Canvas 5 6 MODULE 0 in Canvas Due: Discussions #1 and #2 replies in Canvas 7 8 9 10 MODULE 1 in Canvas Due: Ch. 1 in CengageNOW -- Exercises/Problems 11 12 13 MODULE 1 in Canvas Due: Ch. 1 in CengageNOW -- Concepts Check 14 15 16 17 MODULE 2 in Canvas Due: Ch. 2 in CengageNOW -- Exercises/Problems 18 19 20 MODULE 2 in Canvas Due: Ch. 2 in CengageNOW -- Concepts Check -- Analysis Questions 21 22 23 24 MODULE 3 in Canvas Due: Ch. 3 in CengageNOW -- Exercises/Problems 25 26 27 MODULE 3 in Canvas Due: Ch. 3 in CengageNOW -- Concepts Check -- Analysis Questions 28 29 30 May 1 MODULE 4 in Canvas Due: Ch. 4 in CengageNOW -- Exercises/Problems 2 3 4 MODULE 4 in Canvas Due: Ch. 4 in CengageNOW -- Concepts Check -- Analysis Questions 5 6 7 8 MODULE 5 in Canvas Due: Ch. 5 in CengageNOW -- Exercises/Problems -- Concepts Check 9 10 11 MODULE 6 in Canvas Due: Ch. 6 in CengageNOW -- Exercises/Problems -- Concepts Check 12 13 14 15 MODULE 7 in Canvas Due: Ch. 7 in CengageNOW -- Exercises/Problems 16 17 18 MODULE 7 in Canvas Due: Ch. 7 in CengageNOW -- Concepts Check -- Analysis Questions 19 20 21 22 MODULE 8 in Canvas Due: Ch. 8 in CengageNOW -- Exercises/Problems -- Concepts Check 23 24 25 26 Memorial Day 27 28 29 MODULE 9 in Canvas Due: Ch. 9 in CengageNOW -- Exercises/Problems -- Concepts Check 30 31 June 1 MODULE 9 in Canvas Due: Financial Analysis Project in CengageNOW 2 3 4 5 MODULE 10 in Canvas Due: Ch. 15 in CengageNOW -- Exercises/Problems -- Concepts Check 6 7 8 MODULE 11 in Canvas Due: Ch. 11/12 in Cengage -- Exercises/Problems 9 10 11 12 MODULE 11 in Canvas Due: Ch. 11/12 in Cengage -- Concepts Check Reflection Essay in CengageNOW 13



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Understanding What You are Reading -- The Asset Section of the Balance Sheet
Posted On: Nov. 21, 2017
Author: Shipra


Understanding What You are Reading -- The Asset Section of the Balance Sheet It is important that you understand what you are reading (and what you are not reading) when you look at the asset section of a balance sheet. Some items that are valuable to a company (employees, reputation, location, trademarks, etc.) are not shown anywhere on the balance sheet. The reason they are not included is that they were not acquired in transactions and, therefore, there is no objective way to determine their original cost or their future value to the company. Some intangible assets (patents, copyrights, trademarks, for example) are included as assets on the balance sheet IF, and only if, they were purchased or developed in-house and their costs were tracked. Goodwill is another example of an intangible asset included in the balance sheet. Goodwill is part of the purchase price when one company buys another company and the purchase price is greater than the value of all the assets minus the value of all the liabilities purchased. In other words, the purchasing company paid extra for something intangible, and we call that Goodwill. It is included on the balance sheet because it was acquired in a transaction and, therefore, the company has verifiable information about its cost. A second important thing to understand is that when you look at the Property, Plant, and Equipment section of the balance sheet, you are not looking at the current value of the assets listed. You are seeing the original cost of the items and accumulated depreciation. It would be pure coincidence if the amount shown on the balance sheet for fixed assets was equivalent to their current market value. Accounting rules require companies to record assets at their cost and to not adjust that amount on the balance sheet based on changes in the value (except in the case of a significant drop in value such as with Goodwill impairment). Again, this is because changes in value do not happen in transactions; therefore, they are subjective and not recordable. Land is a good example. Typically, land increases in value. If a company purchased land for $20,000, it would stay on the balance sheet at $20,000 until it was sold. Although the value of the land probably would increase each year, the amount on the balance sheet remains at $20,000. Related to this, do not think of depreciation as the loss in value of an asset. Think of it as the allocation of the cost of an asset over the asset’s useful life. For example, if a company purchased a vehicle for $20,000 and estimated the vehicle will provide benefit to the company for five years and will be worth nothing at the end of that five years, the company would “depreciate” the vehicle at the rate of 1/5 of its cost in each of the five years of its life ($4,000 per year). At the end of the third year, the vehicle would be shown on the balance sheet as $20,000, with accumulated depreciation of $12,000, so the book value of the vehicle would be $8,000. If the company sold the vehicle at that time, it is unlikely it would sell for $8,000. The current market value of the vehicle at that point in time would probably be different from its book value. There are some assets on the balance sheet that are close to current market value. Cash is the best example. Cash on the balance sheet reflects the amount of cash the company has as of the balance sheet date. Accounts receivable, less allowance for doubtful accounts, is another example of the balance sheet amount being close to what the asset is worth. However, the amount for most other assets on the balance sheet is very different from the value of the asset on the balance sheet date. The purpose of the balance sheet is not to show the current value of assets or of the company. Unfortunately, many people (even many in business) do not understand that assets are shown on the balance sheet at their historical cost, not their current value. Because Total Assets on the balance sheet is usually significantly different from the current market value of the total assets of the company (because some valuable items are not even included on the balance sheet and because most of the ones that are shown are not shown at current value), and because Assets = Liabilities + Owners’ Equity, it is also erroneous to think that Owners’ Equity shows the current value of the company. Mathematically, that is impossible; because the left side of the equation does not have anything to do with current value, neither can the right side. We will cover Owners’ Equity in Chapter 8, and you will see that it is a combination of information from the past and has nothing to do with the company’s current value.



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B Finanical Accounting Standard Board
Posted On: Nov. 20, 2017
Author: Shipra


1 B Finanical Accounting Standard Board 2 A Proprietorship 3 D Going concern principle 4 B 322000000 5 D No effect on the accounting equation because the effect cancel out 6 D Does all of the above 7 C Owner is personally liable 8 C Net income of 27000 9 D results of operations for a specific period 10 B 5.80%



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Fuel usage is something that definitely needs to be addressed within the next few years. Not only is the use of fossil fuels harmful for our environmental, it also is
Posted On: Nov. 18, 2017
Author: Shipra


Fuel usage is something that definitely needs to be addressed within the next few years. Not only is the use of fossil fuels harmful for our environmental, it also is painful to our wallets. “It's estimated that at present proved reserves of oil could meet another 40 years of demand at current rates of consumption.” (Turk & Bensel, 2011). This means that within the next few decades the price of oil will continue to raise, potentially leaving working-class citizens without the means to afford this valuable resource and necessity. Our text also states that “oil prices soared from $24 per barrel in early 2003 to a peak of $70 per barrel in September 2005” as well as question if this is simply a temporary “glitch” in how well we are able to extract this material from the Earth. (Turk & Bensel, 2011). In my opinion, fossil fuels are not a “temporary glitch”. Once they are gone, they are gone. No other way to debate that matter.I believe that we should look into alternate fuel sources. One way may be to find a way to make electric cars more affordable to the everyday person or family. More models of electric vehicles and a higher availability of charging stations would immediately improve our situation and help phase out our need for gasoline powered vehicles. According to Business Week “the U.S. Energy Dept. has agreed to lend $8.5 billion to help companies large and small retool plants to make more fuel-efficient cars and develop new technologies. On Sept. 22, 2009 the Energy Department announced the latest such loan: $528 million for a Silicon Valley startup called Fisker Automotive that vows to produce 130,000 plug-in hybrids by 2013.” (Welch, 2009). Hopefully this will aid in the availability of electric vehicles to blue collar workers.Another alternative to gasoline would be the use of vegetable oil powered vehicles and production plants. According to Global News , the conversion can range from $1,500 to $3,000 depending on the model of vehicle. (Reeb, 2005). This is most likely less than what the average family spends on gas in a year. With the amount of fast food restaurants and other facilities that produce fried foods, vegetable oil is not in short supply and this would provide a great recycling program. I believe this would be an affordable and effective alternative as long as they perfect the technology and keep it affordable. ReferencesReeb, T. (2005, Aug 28). Switching to vegetable oil for cars. Global News Transcripts. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/docview/190223417?accountid=32521Turk, J., & Bensel, T. (2011). Contemporary environmental issues. San Diego, CA: Bridgepoint Education, Inc.Welch, D. (2009, Oct 12). A LONG BET ON ELECTRIC CARS. Business Week, , 32. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/docview/236762284?accountid=32521 Price of fuel is rising day by day and its consumption is also on the rise. The writer has provided sufficient data to explain the importance of switching over to use of alternate fuels. In the pursuit of finding alternate source of energy, government’s contribution cannot be undermined. Without support of the government in terms of providing financial aid, it would be difficult to pursue research work. Use of electric cars is also another option even though its practicality is subject to debate.



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I got a 45 on my test score. This placed me in the low willingness to listen bracket. As a result of the test score I think that I will pay more close attention to my
Posted On: Nov. 18, 2017
Author: Shipra


I got a 45 on my test score. This placed me in the low willingness to listen bracket. As a result of the test score I think that I will pay more close attention to my listening skills when I next have interpersonal communication. I do not feel that this test score was accurate for me at all. I am very empathetic when people are speaking to me and listen carefully in order to hear the full detail of the report which I usually translate back with accuracy. Specifically when advocating for my cousin who has a learning disability. This test basically asked the same question over and over again for the first half of the test; do you like boring speakers? I found the repetitious question to be unfair and bias being the main source for the grading criteria. There are many type of listeners mentioned in chapter seven of our book; appreciate, comprehensive, empathetic and evaluate. The questioning seemed to be geared for appreciative listening. However, if you are listening to a boring speaker you are usually at this meeting mandatorily like when you are at work. Mandatory meetings require evaluative or comprehensive listening; listening for facts, information or ideas that may be of use to you (Sole, 2011, p.190), they are not attended for pleasure. The test questions, according to me, do not point out to ability to listening skills. These questions are repetitive in nature and by just twisting words; one is expected to give answers to the same thought process. if the result of the test is to be believed then t is a good indicator to start focusing on improving listening skills. One should not get irritated or bored by listening to speakers. On the contrary, it is important to listen to him and not to form any opinion without first hearing out.



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Traditional costing reflects full cost pertaining to a product. It is easy to use and therefore practiced widely. The allocation of overhead cost under the system is
Posted On: Nov. 17, 2017
Author: Shipra


Traditional costing reflects full cost pertaining to a product. It is easy to use and therefore practiced widely. The allocation of overhead cost under the system is based on a rate determined by either relevant activity levels achieved. The system eliminates the defects of traditional/ absorption costing system. percentage of direct labour cost or number of labour hours worked or other. Therefore, the reported allocation of overhead for a given product may be incorrect. It is main defect of absorption costing. ABC also reflects full cost pertaining to a product. ABC system establishes relationship between overheads costs and activities so that we can better allocate overhead costs. It reflects the more accurate use of overhead costs based on their



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(This project is valued at 5% of the final grade.) Financial Statement Analysis provides information that indicates how a company is
Posted On: Nov. 17, 2017
Author: Shipra


(This project is valued at 5% of the final grade.) Financial Statement Analysis provides information that indicates how a company is performing. By comparing financial statements of different years, a manager can make informed decisions about investments, expenditures, and activities that impact revenues. Directions: Read the chapter in the text titled “Financial Statement Analysis.”Using the comparative financial statements for Baby Cakes International Inc. (see “BabyCakes_Financial_Project_Data.xls” linked in the lesson activities) ,complete the following tasks. Note: The market price of BabyCakes Int’l, Inc. common stock was $20 on December 31, 2008. Part A: Complete the 19 ratios listed below. Determine the following measures for 2008: 1. Working Capital 2. Current ratio 3. Quick ratio 4. Accounts receivable turnover 5. Number of days’ sales in receivables 6. Inventory turnover 7. Number of days’ sales in inventory 8. Ratio of fixed assets to long-term liabilities 9. Ratio of liabilities to stockholders’ equity 10. Number of times interest charges earned 11. Number of times preferred dividends earned 12. Ratio of net sales to assets 13. Rate earned on total assets 14. Rate earned on stockholders’ equity 15. Rate earned on common stockholder’s equity 16. Earnings per share on common stock 17. Price-earnings ratio 18. Dividends per share of common stock 19. Dividend yield Part B: Explain what the results of each ratio indicate about the company. Part C: Complete a horizontalanalysis for the Income Statement, and explain your findings. Part D: Complete a vertical analysis for the Income Statement, and explain your findings.



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T-Accts revised
Posted On: Nov. 17, 2017
Author: Shipra


Balance Sheet Income Statement Assets Revenue COGS Wage Expense Cash Marketable Securities A/R ADA 1,845,000 1,131,000 483,000 525,710 210,000 75,000 51,000 455,000 320,000 25,000 1,098,000 700,750 524,000 62,500 80,000 51,000 848,700 135,000 48,200 1,098,550 673,225 115,000 298,350 603,900 273,181 20,800 23,676 305,000 823,912 320,000 37,500 32,000 470,000 996,300 19,000 26,000 537,656 4,062,350 2,504,975 1,007,000 1,013,760 460,000 2,000,000 155,000 Interest Income Interest Expense Bad Debt Expense 494,100 78,000 135,000 518,000 9,000 48,200 710,000 84,000 19,125 273,181 526,000 8,800 32,440 274,638 51,000 23,167 61,000 93,000 278,000 487,500 83,732 321,381 478,000 54,000 47,000 Depreciation Expense Gain on sale Loss on sale 2,565,878 75,000 2,276,512 346,381 525,000 750,000 Interest Receivable Inventory Equipment Accumulated Deprec. 52,500 76,000 23,676 23,676 975,000 1,131,000 5,000,000 634,000 2,000,000 7,700 10,000 663,000 700,750 210,000 525,000 716,875 673,225 80,000 52,500 888,750 7,700 585,200 836,000 Advertising Expense Utility Expense Office Supplies Expense - 738,650 4,656,000 2,585,200 37,500 47,000 9,300 Long-Term Notes Receivable Land Office Supplies Office Furniture 285,000 1,450,000 1,250,000 3,520 9,300 980,000 19,000 37,500 47,000 9,300 285,000 1,180,000 13,220 Fuel Expense Insurance Expense Rent Expense Prepaid Insurance Prepaid Rent Patent Securities Fair Value Adjustment (Trading) 8,800 121,000 22,750 139,836 121,000 29,050 22,750 8,400 23,167 278,000 23,167 78,000 23,167 84,000 8,800 144,167 22,750 273,669 61,133 75,600 Prepaid Adjusting 37,500 37,500 - Liabilities Amortization Expense Bond Interest Expense Unrealized Holding Gain or Loss A/P Wages Payable Dividends Payable Long-Term Note Payable 8,400 305,000 450,000 35,000 35,000 155,000 155,000 45,000 1,250,000 460,000 364,650 46,000 1,025,000 115,000 93,000 179,219 888,750 8,400 1,024,619 46,000 1,025,000 1,320,000 Deferred Revenue Short-term Note Payable Interest Payable Unearned Revenue 510,000 19,125 20,800 32,000 526,000 510,000 19,125 537,200 Bonds Payable Discount on Bonds Payable Bond Interest Payable Premium on Bonds Payable 2,560 1,000,000 13,760 35,000 1,035,000 11,200 Stockholders Equity Contributed Capital Retained Earnings Common Stock APIC 500,000 1,722,386 1,000,000 1,824,406 26,000 62,500 526,000 1,722,386 1,062,500 1,824,406 Treasury Stock Dividends 487,500 1,025,000 487,500 1,025,000



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CHAPTER 5 NAME ______________________________ PROBLEM #1 The following accounts are taken from the adjusted trial balance of the Devino
Posted On: Nov. 17, 2017
Author: Shipra


CHAPTER 5 NAME ______________________________ PROBLEM #1 The following accounts are taken from the adjusted trial balance of the Devino Company at December 31, 2009: Sales 250000 sales salaries expense 14000 Administrative salaries expense 15000 depreciation expense equipment 8000 purchases 160000 sales returns 1000 purchase returns 2000 freight in 10000 inventory 1-1-09 80000 retained earnings 1-1-09 60000 In addition, the following information is available: 1 In December , an accountant for the company discovered that depreciation in the amount of $5000 (pretax) on a major piece of equipment had not been recorded in 2002. The amount is considered material 2 The inventory on December 31, 2009 was $75,000. 3 Ten thousand shares of common stock were outstanding during the entire year. Devino paid dividends of $1.00 per share 4 At the end of October Devino sold its unprofitable restaurant component. From January thru October, the component had incurred an operating loss (pretax) of $14,000. The sale was made at a loss(pretax) of $8000. 5 In November the company sold the only land it ever owned for a gain of $10,000. 6 The applicable tax rate is 30% Prepare an Income Statement for Devino Company multi step; single step Devino Company Single Step income statement For the year ended December 31, 2009 Sales 250000 Less: Sales returns 1000 Net sales 249000 income from sale of land 10000 Total revenue 259000 Cost of goods sold Purchases 160000 Less: Purchase returns 2000 Net purchases 158000 Add: Inventory as on 1.01.2009 80000 Less: Inventory as on 31.12.2009 75000 Add: Freight in 10000 Cost of goods sold 173000 Administrative expense 15000 Depreciation expense 13000 Loss from discontinued operation 14000 Loss from sale of restaurant 8000 Sales salaries expense 14000 Tax expense 6600 Dividend 10000 Total Expenses 253600 Net income 5400 Devino Company Multi Step income statement For the year ended December 31, 2009 Sales 250000 Less: Sales returns 1000 Net sales 249000 Cost of goods sold Purchases 160000 Less: Purchase returns 2000 Net purchases 158000 Add: Inventory as on 1.01.2009 80000 Less: Inventory as on 31.12.2009 75000 Add: Freight in 10000 Cost of goods sold 173000 Gross profit 76000 Expenses Administrative expense 15000 Depreciation expense 13000 Sales salaries expense 14000 Expenses 42000 Net operative income 34000 Non operative income/ loss income from sale of land 10000 Loss from discontinued operation -14000 Loss from sale of restaurant -8000 Total non operating loss -12000 Profit before tax 22000 Tax 6600 Profit after tax 15400 Less: Dividend 10000 Retained earning 5400 Retained earning as on 1.01.2009 60000 Retained earning as on 31.12.2009 65400 Problem #2 The following are several items involving the cash flow activities of the Fuelrite Company for 2009. Net Income $62000 Payment of dividends $15000 1000 shares of stock were issued at $20 par $20000 Took out a mortgage on property $175000 Amortization expense on patents $4,000 Purchased new building $180,000 Plant assets were acquired at a cost of $60,000 Sold land $25000 Accounts receivable increased by $8000 Accounts payable decreased by $12000 Salaries payable increased by $5000 Ending Cash Balance $34000 Beginning cash balance $18,000 Prepare the statement of cash flows of the Fuelrite Company for 2009 using the cash flow from operations, investing & financing Fuelrite Company Statement of cash flows As on 31 December 2009 Cash flow from operating activities Net income 62000 Add: amortisation expense 4000 Increase in accounts receivable -8000 Decrease in accounts payable -12000 Increase in salary payable 5000 Cash flow from operating activities 51000 Cash flow from investing activities Purchase of building -180000 Plant purchased -60000 Land sold 25000 Cash flow from investing activities -215000 Cash flow from financing activities Dividend paid -15000 Shares issued 20000 Mortgage loan 175000 Cash flow from investing activities 180000 Net cash flow 16000 Beginning cash balance 18000 ending cash balance 34000 BONUS QUESTION Indicate where each component would be reported in the financial statements by inserting the corresponding code letter in the space provided a Sales Revenue - net b cost of goods sold c selling expense d general and administrative expenses e other revenue and expenses f results from discontinued operations g extraordinary items h prior period adjustments i additions to retained earnings (other than h) j deductions from retained earnings (other than h) k footnotes to financial statements l ending balance sheet b Merchandise inventory j cash dividends declared on common stock g flood loss (infrequent and unusual) g expenses incurred as a result of a strike e discount on bonds payable h correction of erroneous overstatement of last years ending inventory e loss from write-off of a significant accounts receivable d additional depreciation on office equipment resulting from decrease in estimated useful life d interest expense b transportation in



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Debit Credit Cash 2,565,878 Marketable securities 75,000 Accounts receivable 2,276,512 Allowance for bad debt 346,381 Inventory 738,650 Equipment 4,656,000 Accumulated...
Posted On: Nov. 17, 2017
Author: Shipra


Debit Credit Cash 2,565,878 Marketable securities 75,000 Accounts receivable 2,276,512 Allowance for bad debt 346,381 Inventory 738,650 Equipment 4,656,000 Accumulated depreciation 2,585,200 LT notes receivable 285,000 Land 1,180,000 Office supplies 13,220 Office furniture - Prepaid insurance 296,836 Prepaid rent 61,133 Patent 75,600 Security fair value adj. - Interest receivable - Truck - Accounts payable 1,024,619 Wages payable 46,000 Dividends payable 1,025,000 LT notes payable 1,410,000 Deferred revenue - ST notes payable 510,000 Interest payable 19,125 Unearned revenue 537,200 Treasury stock - Bonds payable 1,035,000 Doscount of bonds payable - Bond interest payable Premium on bond payable 16,320 Contributed cap 526,000 Retained earning - Common stock - APIC 1,824,406 Revenue 4,062,350 COGS 2,504,975 Wages expense 1,007,000 Interest income - Interest expense 60,565 Bad debt expense 321,381 Depreciation Exp 585,200 Gain on sale 836,000 Loss on sale Advertising expense 37,500 Utilities expense 47,000 Office supplies expense 9,300 Fuel expense 8,800 Insurance expense 144,167 Rent expense 22,750 Security holding loss - Dividend - Amortisation expense 8,400



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23-3 Reject order accept order Net income increase/ (decrease) Revenues 0 118530 118530 Cost manufacturing 0 79020 -79020 Shipping 0 4390 -4390 net income 0 ...
Posted On: Nov. 17, 2017
Author: Shipra


23-3 Reject order accept order Net income increase/ (decrease) Revenues 0 118530 118530 Cost manufacturing 0 79020 -79020 Shipping 0 4390 -4390 net income 0 35120 35120 The special order should be accepted 23-6 Retain equipment Replace equipment net 5 year income increase/ (decrease) Variable manufacturing cost 3174000 1992500 1181500 New machine cost 227600 -227600 Total 3174000 2220100 953900 The old factory machine should be replaced



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Financial Statement Analysis 2011 2012 2013 Earnings Per Share Net Income 0.08 0.04 0.06 Number of Common Shares Outstanding
Posted On: Nov. 17, 2017
Author: Shipra


Financial Statement Analysis 2011 2012 2013 Earnings Per Share Net Income 0.08 0.04 0.06 Number of Common Shares Outstanding $0.06 could be distributed to each share after all expenses have been paid Amount of profit that could be distributed for each share 2011 2012 2013 Price-earnings ratio Market Value per Share 34.80 94.52 89.18 Earnings per Share (EPS) Compares price per share to earnings per share of common stock. Investors pay 89 times more for the share than its 2012 earnings Quantifies expected future earnings of the company by investors 2011 2012 2013 Return on Equity Net Income 0.07 0.03 0.05 Total Equity Generated $0.05 profit for every $1 of equity $0.05 could be distributed to each share after all expenses have been paid Amount of earnings generated using share holder's investments Amount of profit that could be distributed for each share 2011 2012 2013 Working Capital Current Assets - Current Liabilities $1,340,980 $1,561,792 $3,464,758 Liquidity measure, the ability to pay back short term obligations 2011 2012 2013 Current Ratio Total Current Assets 2.82 3.44 2.10 Total Current Liabilities There is $2.10 of current assets for every $1 of current liabilities Liquidity measure, amount of assets compared to liabilities 2011 2012 2013 Quick Ratio Cash+Marketable Securities+Accounts Receivable 1.62 1.65 1.83 Total Current Liabilities $1.83 of cash equivalents to pay for every $1 of short term bills to pay More stringent liquidity measure, ability to pay short term obligations without selling inventory 2011 2012 2013 AR Turnover Sales Revenues 4.65 2.97 (Beginning A/R + Ending A/R) / 2 Days sales in AR 365/AR Turnover 78 123 Average of 123 days to collect cash from sales on account Ability to collect cash from company sales 2011 2012 2013 Inventory Turnover Cost of Goods Sold 0.97 0.99 (Beginning Inventory + Ending Inventory) / 2 Days Sales in Inv. 365/Inv. Turnover 376 368 Average of 368 days to sell inventory Inventory management measure, how quickly inventory is purchased and sold 2011 2012 2013 Gross Profit Gross Sales – Cost of goods sold $1,720,000 $1,430,000 $1,557,375 Amount of revenue generated from sales minus the cost of that inventory 2011 2012 2013 Gross Profit Ratio Gross Profit 0.69 0.63 0.38 Net Sales For every $1 of sales $0.38 is gross profit Measures how many cents per dollar of sales revenue is profit 2011 2012 2013 Operating Income Gross Income - Operating Expenses $282,923 $193,386 $(629,223) Amount sales revenue left over after covering expenses to generate that revenue 2011 2012 2013 Operating Margin Operating Income 0.11 0.08 -0.15 Net Sales After paying for the goods to be sold and the selling expenses, $0.19 is left over for every $1 spent Overall profitability of operations, how many cents per dollar of operating are profit 2011 2012 2013 Debt-to-equity ratio Total Liabilities 0.39 0.37 1.16 Total Equity $1.16 of every $1 is obtained from borrowing debt rather and $1 is contributed from owners Amount of financing from debt compared to owners equity 2011 2012 2013 Book value per share Book Value 0.25 0.25 0.25 # Shares of Stock Outstanding After all debts are paid investors would get $0.25 per share they own Safety measure, amount left over per share after a company pays all of it's liabilities 2011 2012 2013 Return on Assets Net Income 0.05 0.02 0.02 Total Assets $0.02 of profit is generated with every $1 of total assets Performance measure, reflects company's ability to generate profits from its total assets 2011 2012 2013 AP Turnover Inventory Purchases Inventory purchase figure is not available (Beginning A/P + Ending A/P) / 2 Days Purchases in AP 365/AP Turnover #VALUE! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! Average of 93.83 days to collect cash from sales on account Ability to collect cash from company sales 2011 2012 2013 Profit Margin Net Income 0.13 0.07 0.06 Sales revenue For every $1 of sales in 2012 $0.06 is profit Measures profitability of company's operations 2011 2012 2013 Sales on Assets Sales revenue 0.36 0.33 0.40 Total Assets Company generates $0.40 of sales revenue for every $1 of total assets Measure how well company is managing total assets 2011 2012 2013 Financial Leverage Total Assets 1.39 1.37 2.16 Total Equity Every $2.16 of total assets is financed with $1 of equity and $1.16 of liability (borrowed money) Shows how assets are paid for DuPont Analysis ROE = Profitability X Efficiency X Leverage (Profit Margin) (Sales on assets) (use of debt) 2011= 0.07 0.13 0.36 1.39 2012= 0.03 0.07 0.33 1.37 2013= 0.05 0.06 0.40 2.16 This shows fall in Company's profitability . But imporvement in efficiency. The Company is under leveraged.



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" American West Dental Group Statement of Cash Flows For The Year Ending December 31, 2012 "
Posted On: Nov. 17, 2017
Author: Shipra


" American West Dental Group Statement of Cash Flows For The Year Ending December 31, 2012 " 2013 Cash Flows from (used in) Operating Activities: Net Income 199,150 Adjustments: Increase in Depreciation 19,600 Increase in Amortization of intangible assets 700 Increase in dividend expense 106,500 Increase in loss on Sale of Equipment 3,000 Decrease in prepaid insurance 2,600 Increase in Trade and other receivables (53,250) Increase in Inventories (230,200) Increase in Accounts Payable 13,750 Increase in Interest Payable 500 Net cash provided (used) by operating activities 62,350 Cash flows from (used in ) investing activities: Purchase of building (20,000) Sale of equipment 12,000 Purchase of investments (40,000) Sale of land 25,000 Net cash used in investing activities (23,000) Financing activities Increase in Bonds 100,000 Issuance of Stock 490,000 Payment of dividend (106,500) Net cash from financing activities 483,500 Net increase in cash and cash equivalents 522,850 Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of the year 100,000 Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the year 622,850



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Merchandise inventory 1,738 1,264 1,104 932 836 710 515 337.5% 245.4% 214.4% 181.0% 162.3% 137.9% 100.0% ...
Posted On: Nov. 17, 2017
Author: Shipra


SUGO COMPANY Comparative Income Statements December 31, 2012 - 2006 Trend Percents - Income Statement 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 Sales 1,594 1,396 1,270 1,164 1,086 1,010 828 192.5% 168.6% 153.4% 140.6% 131.2% 122.0% 100.0% Cost of goods sold 1,146 932 802 702 652 610 SUGO COMPANY Comparative Income Statements December 31, 2012 - 2006 Trend Percents - Income Statement 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 Sales 1,594 1,396 1,270 1,164 1,086 1,010 828 192.5% 168.6% 153.4% 140.6% 131.2% 122.0% 100.0% Cost of goods sold 1,146 932 802 702 652 610 486 235.8% 191.8% 165.0% 144.4% 134.2% 125.5% 100.0% Gross profit 448 464 468 462 434 400 342 131.0% 135.7% 136.8% 135.1% 126.9% 117.0% 100.0% Operating expenses 340 266 244 180 156 154 128 265.6% 207.8% 190.6% 140.6% 121.9% 120.3% 100.0% Net income 108 198 224 282 278 246 214 50.5% 92.5% 104.7% 131.8% 129.9% 115.0% 100.0% SUGO COMPANY Comparative Balance Sheets December 31, 2012 - 2006 Trend Percents - Balance Sheet 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 Assets Cash 68 88 92 94 98 96 99 68.7% 88.9% 92.9% 94.9% 99.0% 97.0% 100.0% Accounts receivable, net 480 504 456 350 308 292 206 233.0% 244.7% 221.4% 169.9% 149.5% 141.7% 100.0% Merchandise inventory 1,738 1,264 1,104 932 836 710 515 337.5% 245.4% 214.4% 181.0% 162.3% 137.9% 100.0% Other current assets 46 42 24 44 38 38 19 242.1% 221.1% 126.3% 231.6% 200.0% 200.0% 100.0% Long-term investments - - - 136 136 136 136 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% Plant assets, net 2,120 2,114 1,852 1,044 1,078 960 825 257.0% 256.2% 224.5% 126.5% 130.7% 116.4% 100.0% Total assets 4,452 4,012 3,528 2,600 2,494 2,232 1,800 247.3% 222.9% 196.0% 144.4% 138.6% 124.0% 100.0% Liabilities and Equity Current liabilities 1,120 942 618 514 446 422 272 411.8% 346.3% 227.2% 189.0% 164.0% 155.1% 100.0% Long-term Liabilities 1,194 1,040 1,012 470 480 520 390 306.2% 266.7% 259.5% 120.5% 123.1% 133.3% 100.0% Common stock 1,000 1,000 1,000 840 840 640 640 156.3% 156.3% 156.3% 131.3% 131.3% 100.0% 100.0% Other paid-in captial 250 250 250 180 180 160 160 156.3% 156.3% 156.3% 112.5% 112.5% 100.0% 100.0% Retained earnings 888 780 648 596 548 490 338 262.7% 230.8% 191.7% 176.3% 162.1% 145.0% 100.0% Total liabilities and equity 4,452 4,012 3,528 2,600 2,494 2,232 1,800 247.3% 222.9% 196.0% 144.4% 138.6% 124.0% 100.0% 486 235.8% 191.8% 165.0% 144.4% 134.2% 125.5% 100.0% Gross profit 448 464 468 462 434 400 342 131.0% 135.7% 136.8% 135.1% 126.9% 117.0% 100.0% Operating expenses 340 266 244 180 156 154 128 265.6% 207.8% 190.6% 140.6% 121.9% 120.3% 100.0% Net income 108 198 224 282 278 246 214 50.5% 92.5% 104.7% 131.8% 129.9% 115.0% 100.0% SUGO COMPANY Comparative Balance Sheets December 31, 2012 - 2006 Trend Percents - Balance Sheet 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 Assets Cash 68 88 92 94 98 96 99 68.7% 88.9% 92.9% 94.9% 99.0% 97.0% 100.0% Accounts receivable, net 480 504 456 350 308 292 206 233.0% 244.7% 221.4% 169.9% 149.5% 141.7% 100.0% Merchandise inventory 1,738 1,264 1,104 932 836 710 515 337.5% 245.4% 214.4% 181.0% 162.3% 137.9% 100.0% Other current assets 46 42 24 44 38 38 19 242.1% 221.1% 126.3% 231.6% 200.0% 200.0% 100.0% Long-term investments - - - 136 136 136 136 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% Plant assets, net 2,120 2,114 1,852 1,044 1,078 960 825 257.0% 256.2% 224.5% 126.5% 130.7% 116.4% 100.0%